Morrinsville School - 30/01/2015

Findings

Morrinsville School’s positive tone and culture reflect its vision and values in a bicultural context. Over the past two years, trustees, senior leaders and teachers have made good use of professional development to significantly improve curriculum, assessment and sustainability. The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Background and Context

What is the background and context for this school’s review?

Morrinsville School caters for students in Years 1 to 8 from in and around Morrinsville. Fifty-two percent of the school’s roll identify as Māori. Previous ERO reviews have noted a significant emphasis on providing Māori students with a strong sense of culture, identity and language and this continues to be a feature of the school. Year 7 and 8 students benefit from continual integration of te reo and tikanga Māori within a bilingual programme.

The 2012 ERO review found that teachers demonstrated caring and affirming relationships with students and a holistic focus on learning, well being and pastoral care. Effective teaching practices included the maintenance of attractive and stimulating learning environments. This review finds that these positive features continue to be evident. The 2012 report also found that there was a need for further focuses on curriculum, assessment and aspects of governance and self review that were likely to affect the sustainability of the school’s performance.

Since the 2012 ERO review, trustees and staff have engaged in comprehensive professional development to address identified areas for improvement. ERO has maintained regular contact with the school and noted considerable progress throughout this time.

The school’s positive tone and culture reflect its vision of Tō Tātou Kainga (our place) and values of whangai, whakatipu, whakamanawa (nurture, grow, inspire). These are explicitly promoted and well articulated by students. Parents and whānau engage in many school activities and appreciate the sense of belonging and whanaungatanga that is continually promoted by staff and students. A calm, settled tone continues to support students’ learning.

2 Review and Development

How effectively is the school addressing its priorities for review and development?

Priorities identified for review and development

  • Assessment, including the use of achievement information by trustees, senior leaders, teachers, and students, and overall teacher judgments in relation to National Standards.
  • Curriculum - there was a need to identify and document the school’s local response to The New Zealand Curriculum.
  • Sustainability, including strategic planning, self-review and staff appraisal processes.

Progress

Assessment

Trustees, senior leaders, teachers, and students make effective use of assessment information to improve students’ engagement, learning, progress and achievement. During the past two years senior leaders and teachers have reviewed and refined:

  • processes for reporting to parents in relation to National Standards
  • the use of assessment tools to provide meaningful achievement information throughout the year
  • teachers’ and students’ use of assessment information to guide judgements about achievement and next learning steps
  • procedures for reporting to the board on school-wide achievement and the progress and achievement of priority students.

The school is now well placed to sustain this progress.

Curriculum

Morrinsville School’s curriculum effectively promotes and supports students’ learning. The school’s curriculum continues to give appropriate emphasis to reading, writing, mathematics and te reo Māori. Teachers have developed an integrated approach to presenting the curriculum in meaningful contexts and there is a renewed focus on science education. Senior leaders have documented the school’s local response to The New Zealand Curriculum in consultation with teachers and the community.

Many effective teaching practices continue to be evident. Teachers provide specific, meaningful written feedback and feed forward to students about their work. Targeted and priority learners continue to be tracked and monitored to ensure progress is accelerated.

Information and communication technologies (ICT) are used as tools for engagement and learning. Teachers and students make continual use of ICT for individual inquiry and to support progress for priority students and learning across the curriculum.

3 Sustainable performance and self review

How well placed is the school to sustain and continue to improve and review its performance?

The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance because:

  • Trustees responded positively to recommendations from the 2012 report and have undertaken training to strengthen their governance roles and responsibilities.
  • There is a clear vision and strategic approach to guide the school’s direction.
  • Self review at all levels guides continuous improvement.
  • Performance management systems have been strengthened and are now more focused on improving outcomes for students.

Key next steps

The board, senior leaders, staff and ERO agree that the school’s next steps are to maintain the momentum of improvement through continual robust self review and related professional training and development.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Morrinsville School’s positive tone and culture reflect its vision and values in a bicultural context. Over the past two years, trustees, senior leaders and teachers have made good use of professional development to significantly improve curriculum, assessment and sustainability. The school is well placed to sustain and improve its performance.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years

Dale Bailey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Northern Northern Region

30 January 2015

About the School

Location

Morrinsville

Ministry of Education profile number

1834

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

209

Gender composition

Girls 58% Boys 42%

Ethnic composition

Māori

Pākehā

Asian

Other

52%

39%

6%

3%

Special Features

Bilingual teaching in Years 7 and 8

Review team on site

November 2014

Date of this report

30 January 2015

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

November 2012

August 2009

October 2006