Newmarket School - 13/09/2010

Community Page

13 September 2010

To the Parents and Community of Newmarket School

These are the findings of the Education Review Office’s latest report on Newmarket School.

Students at Newmarket School enjoy an education that takes advantage of the school’s central urban setting and the commitment of the board of trustees to the bicultural heritage of New Zealand. The school curriculum offers students rich learning experiences that include a focus on the natural environment and sustainable practices. Students report that they appreciate and value the cultural, artistic, sporting and problem-solving opportunities that develop their skills and build their sense of belonging and involvement in the increasingly diverse cultural environment of their school.

Most students achieve well in literacy and numeracy. Since the 2007 ERO report, teachers have continued to make good use of nationally referenced tools to gather formative and summative data on student achievement to guide their teaching and to use in reporting to parents and the board. In classrooms, a range of formative teaching practices supports student learning. Ongoing professional development and collaborative review ensure that good practices are used consistently across the school.

A new strategy of targeted teaching for a group of identified learners is accelerating the progress of some of these students. Māori and Pacific students in these groups have personalised targets and undertake regular reviews of progress with whānau. These good practices, and teacher-aide support, also assist the learning of students with identified English language learning needs. Trustees and school leaders will continue to extend current successful strategies to support teaching and learning developments that cater for the growing diversity of cultures in the school.

Senior staff are effective as leaders in the school and in the wider educational community. They continue to make good use of professional networks, including academic and business links in the community, to support school initiatives. Effective professional leadership is a hallmark of the school.

The senior management team, teachers and Māori staff continue to strengthen Māori perspectives in programmes, extend connections with whānau and build good relationships with Ngāti Whātua and Orakei Marae. This sense of partnership enables whānau to identify their aspirations for their children and teachers to support Māori students to achieve as Māori.

The board of trustees is aware of the challenges of maintaining high quality educational provision in a demographically changing urban setting. The expertise of board members, and the positive, professional relationship between the board and principal, helps to ensure that the school operates effectively to support student learning and achievement.

Future Action

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four to five years.

Review Coverage

This report provides an evaluation of how effectively the school’s curriculum promotes student learning - engagement, progress and achievement. ERO’s evaluation takes account of the school’s previous reporting history and is based on:

  • what is known about student achievement information, including the achievement of Māori and Pacific students;
  • decisions made to improve student achievement using assessment and selfreview information; and
  • teaching strategies and programmes implemented to give effect to the school’s curriculum.

ERO also gathers information during the review to contribute to its national reports. The national reports are published on ERO’s website.

If you would like a copy of the full report, please contact the school or see the ERO website, www.ero.govt.nz.

Richard Thornton

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

General Information about Reviews

About ERO

ERO is an independent, external evaluation agency that undertakes reviews of schools and early childhood services throughout New Zealand.

About ERO Reviews

ERO follows a set of standard procedures to conduct reviews. The purpose of each review is to:

  • improve educational achievement in schools; and
  • provide information to parents, communities and the government.

Reviews are intended to focus on student achievement and build on each school’s self review.

Review Focus

ERO’s framework for reviewing and reporting integrates the following:

  • school curriculum;
  • national evaluation topics –contribute to the development of education policies and their effective implementation; and
  • Board Assurance Statement, including student and staff health and safety.

ERO’s review is responsive to the school’s context. When ERO reviews a school, it takes into account the characteristics of the community from which it draws its students, its aspirations for its young people, and other relevant local factors.

ERO also builds on the school’s own self-review information. ERO is interested in how a school monitors the progress of its students and aspects of school life and culture, and how it uses this information to improve student learning.

This helps ERO to answer the major evaluation question for reviews:

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote student learning - engagement, progress and achievement?

Areas for Development and Review

ERO reports include areas for development and review to support on-going improvement by identifying priorities. Often the school will have identified these matters through its own self review and already plans further development in those areas.

Disclaimer

Individual ERO school and early childhood services reports are public information and may be copied or sent electronically.  However, the Education Review Office can guarantee only the authenticity of original documents which have been obtained in hard copy directly from either the local ERO office or ERO Corporate Office in Wellington.  Please consult your telephone book, or see the ERO web page, http://www.ero.govt.nz, for ERO office addresses.

1. The Education Review Office (ERO) Evaluation

Confirmed Education Review Report:Newmarket School

This report has been prepared in accordance with standard procedures approved by the Chief Review Officer.

Students at Newmarket School enjoy an education that takes advantage of the school’s central urban setting and the commitment of the board of trustees to the bicultural heritage of New Zealand. The school curriculum offers students rich learning experiences that include a focus on the natural environment and sustainable practices. Students report that they appreciate and value the cultural, artistic, sporting and problem-solving opportunities that develop their skills and build their sense of belonging and involvement in the increasingly diverse cultural environment of their school.

Most students achieve well in literacy and numeracy. Since the 2007 ERO report, teachers have continued to make good use of nationally referenced tools to gather formative and summative data on student achievement to guide their teaching and to use in reporting to parents and the board. In classrooms, a range of formative teaching practices supports student learning. Ongoing professional development and collaborative review ensure that good practices are used consistently across the school.

A new strategy of targeted teaching for a group of identified learners is accelerating the progress of some of these students. Māori and Pacific students in these groups have personalised targets and undertake regular reviews of progress with whānau. These good practices, and teacher-aide support, also assist the learning of students with identified English language learning needs. Trustees and school leaders will continue to extend current successful strategies to support teaching and learning developments that cater for the growing diversity of cultures in the school.

Senior staff are effective as leaders in the school and in the wider educational community. They continue to make good use of professional networks, including academic and business links in the community, to support school initiatives. Effective professional leadership is a hallmark of the school.

The senior management team, teachers and Māori staff continue to strengthen Māori perspectives in programmes, extend connections with whānau and build good relationships with Ngāti Whātua and Orakei Marae. This sense of partnership enables whānau to identify their aspirations for their children and teachers to support Māori students to achieve as Māori.

The board of trustees is aware of the challenges of maintaining high quality educational provision in a demographically changing urban setting. The expertise of board members, and the positive, professional relationship between the board and principal, helps to ensure that the school operates effectively to support student learning and achievement.

Future Action

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four to five years.

2. Newmarket School’s Curriculum

How effectively does the curriculum of Newmarket School promote student learning - engagement, progress and achievement?

School context and self review

ERO’s 2007 review affirmed the educational provision for students at Newmarket school and recognised the positive contributions that governance, leadership and teaching were making to student learning. An effective partnership between board and staff encouraged strong community support and curriculum innovation centred on the city context of the school. The principal is continuing to develop collaborative relationships with students, staff, trustees and the community and a growing sense of involvement is evident. Continuity in board membership and in the senior management team supports the continued development of the school.

The school charter includes a commitment to Te Tiriti o Waitangi and to New Zealand’s bicultural heritage, and to actively promoting tikanga Māori through the school’s curriculum. This support helps Māori students, staff and whānau to enjoy a sense of connection with, and involvement in, the school.

The school roll has changed significantly over the past three years, and students from Asian backgrounds now constitute 49% of the roll, compared with 31% in 2007. It is appropriate for trustees and senior leaders to use the school’s effective selfreview processes to reflect on how current successful strategies for teaching and learning could be extended to embrace the growing diversity of cultures in the school.

Areas of strength

School curriculum

  • A noteworthy feature of Newmarket School is the development of a curriculum that is based on the urban setting of the school. Teaching programmes involve children in accessing relevant contexts, experts, and resources from within the community to enhance their learning.
  • Students initiate projects within the school and local community and thus enjoy a rich range of student-led learning experiences. Opportunities to take responsibility, and to exercise self-management and leadership skills, mean that students acquire many attributes that will support them to become confident lifelong learners.
  • The interactive use of information and communication technologies extends students’ thinking and learning and enables them to engage with the wider world.
  • The school’s curriculum reflects values and concepts that stem from the Treaty of Waitangi and New Zealand’s bi-cultural heritage. Tikanga Māori underpin the ethos of the school and students understand how bi-cultural values are reflected in school practices.
  • The school curriculum plan reflects the particular context of the school and the needs of 21st century learners.

Consistent teaching practices. The board of trustees, principal and staff have high expectations that teaching practice will be of consistent good quality across the school.

  • Teachers are involved in many collaborative practices that help them to evaluate the impact of their teaching on student learning.
  • Teachers differentiate programmes for groups of students and for targeted individuals through planning that is informed by recent achievement data.
  • A multi-layered range of learning support and interventions is in place for students who are identified as at risk of underachieving or who require additional support.
  • Formative teaching and learning approaches support students to develop an understanding of their progress and their next steps in learning.

Teachers are provided with appropriate training to support the development of their professional skills.

Student engagement and achievement

  • In literacy and numeracy, most students achieve at levels that are at or above nationally expected levels for their age. The school continues to make good use of nationally referenced assessment tools to gather formative and summative data to guide teaching and to use for reporting to parents and the board of trustees.
  • Targeting of underachieving Māori and Pacific students ensures that each student has personalised goals and participates with whānau in regular reviews of their progress. These good practices, together with teacher-aide support, also assist the learning of students with identified English language learning needs. Some targeted students make accelerated progress in their achievement.
  • Students report that they greatly enjoy school. They appreciate and value cultural, artistic, environmental, sporting and problem-solving opportunities that develop their skills, and increase their sense of belonging and involvement in the school. Students learn that the school is a place that they can look after and a place to which they belong.

Leadership and governance

  • Effective professional leadership is a hallmark of the school. Senior leaders continue to make good use of professional networks, including academic and business links in the community, to support school initiatives.
  • The board of trustees expresses confidence in the educational leadership of the senior staff and seeks to contribute their business and community networking skills. They are aware of the challenges of maintaining high quality educational provision in a dynamic urban setting. The expertise of board members, and the positive professional relationship between the board and principal, helps to ensure that the school operates effectively to support student learning and achievement.
  • The senior management team, teachers and Māori staff continue to reflect Māori perspectives in programmes, extend connections with whānau, and strengthen good relationships with Ngāti Whātua and Orakei Marae. As a result, a strong sense of partnership enables whānau to identify their aspirations for their children so that they can achieve as Māori.

Agreed priorities

During ERO’s discussions with staff and trustees it was evident that current initiatives to enhance teaching and learning provide a sound foundation for ongoing development. Agreed priorities were:

  • targeting the needs of identified learners so that they enjoy a more personalised learning environment that builds on their individual backgrounds, interests and talents; and
  • ensuring that classroom programmes meet the increasingly diverse language learning and cultural needs of students in the school.

3. Provision for International Students

Compliance with the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students and the Provision of English Language Support

Newmarket School is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989.

The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code.

ERO’s investigations confirmed that the school’s self-review processes for international students are robust and that the school complies with all sections of the Code.

Newmarket School has eight international students. It provides these students with good pastoral care and English language support programmes. International students are well integrated into the school community. To improve existing practice, the board could ensure that it is better informed about the education, pastoral care and social integration of international students attending the school.

4. Board Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of Newmarket School completed an ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • board administration;
  • curriculum;
  • management of health, safety and welfare;
  • personnel management;
  • financial management; and
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked policies, procedures and practices about compliance in the following areas because they have a potentially high impact on students’ achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment);
  • physical safety of students;
  • teacher registration;
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions; and
  • attendance.

The checking process indicated that the school has established policies, procedures and practices to enable it to meet its legal obligations.

5. Future Action

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four to five years.

Richard Thornton

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

13 September 2010

About The School

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

Decile1

8

School roll

249

Number of international students

8

Gender composition

Boys 50%, Girls 50%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā 23%, Māori 5%, Chinese 25%, other Asian 15%, South East Asian 9%, Indian 8%, Tongan 3%, Samoan 2%, other European 4%, other Pacific 3%, other 3%

Review team on site

June-July 2010

Date of this report

13 September 2010

Previous three ERO reports

Education Review, August 2007

Education Review, September 2004

Accountability Review, May 2001

1 School deciles range from one to ten. Decile one schools draw their students from low socioeconomic communities and at the other end of the range, decile 10 schools draw their students from high socio-economic communities. Deciles are used to provide funding to state and state integrated schools. The lower the school’s decile the more funding it receives. A school’s decile is in no way linked to the quality of education it provides.