Ngati Toa School - 07/11/2017

Summary

Ngāti Toa School caters for students in Years 1 to 6. At the time of ERO’s visit, the school roll was 168. Most children are Māori. Pacific make up 12% of the roll and Pākehā 7%.

There have been significant changes to school leadership, teaching staff and trustees since the June 2014, ERO report.

The new principal responded positively and purposefully to the areas identified for improvement in ERO’s 2014 evaluation. A refresh of the school’s values and vision has been carried out, in consultation, with parents and whānau, resulting in a draft curriculum document. Positive progress has been made in responding to Māori learners’ culture, language and identities.

Ongoing improvement in the use of assessment data has resulted in better identification of learners at risk of underachievement and processes to monitor their progress and achievement.

Relationships with Ngāti Toa and Te Puna Mātauranga are valued. The school is a member of the Western Porirua Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

School leaders continue to evaluate and strengthen practices to consistently achieve equitable outcomes for all learners. Data shows most students achieve well at the end of Year 6.

End of year 2016 data showed many children achieve well in relation to the National Standards in reading and mathematics. The school identifies achievement in writing as the greatest concern with more students not achieving in relation to the National Standards at the end of 2016, compared to reading and mathematics. A disparity in achievement between girls and boys is evident.

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and other children remains.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for all children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

The school has agreed to an internal evaluation workshop to support them to develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all children.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Leaders are focussed on improving consistency in the use of systems and practices to ensure teachers deliver comprehensive and timely responses for Māori, and all children whose learning and achievement require acceleration. The principal scrutinises schoolwide data to establish trends and patterns and report achievement to trustees.

The school’s 2016 data showed most Māori learners at the end of Year 6 achieve well in relation to the National Standards. Assessment data shows many students at the end of Year 3 need to make significant progress in relation to National Standards expectations. Progress and achievement for the small number of Pacific learners is suitably tracked, monitored and reported.

The principal is leading developments in building teachers’ capability and the school’s capacity to accelerate learning for children who require this and to address the disparity for boys, especially in writing achievement.

Curriculum development and the school’s strengthenedinvolvement with whānau, community groups and iwi has resulted in groups working together more often. These forums focus on improving the wellbeing and achievement of Māori learners. The school’s positive culture and curriculum initiatives result in Māori students engaging in authentic learning experiences reflective of Māori culture, language and identity.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school’s vision and values underpin the curriculum and are integral to students’ schooling experience. Clear guidelines for teaching and learning contribute well to achievement of the expressed expectations for teaching practice.

In the senior school, learning through contexts of high interest motivates students’ engagement. Teachers are increasingly supporting children to know their learning needs and assess their own progress. This enhances their ability to lead their learning. The addition of digital technologies extends the scope of children’s learning.

There is an inclusive and welcoming school culture. Student and whānau aspirations are sought and responded to through a range of well-considered strategies. This contributes positively to children’s wellbeing, engagement and learning.

Regular internal moderation for assessment of writing strengthens teachers’ judgments about achievement. The school continues to improve this practice through moderating externally. Clear processes are promoting consistent schoolwide practice for making valid and dependable judgments in relation to the National Standards.

Additional resourcing, including the provision of support staff, assists learners with identified learning needs. Students with complex needs have individualised programmes responsive to their strengths, interests and goals. Progress is shared with whānau and achievement reported to trustees.

A useful process is established to inquire into the effectiveness of trustees’ stewardship in meeting the school’s aims and goals.

The principal facilitates appropriate guidance to leaders to support delivery of curriculum expectations. Participation in professional learning has been undertaken to strengthen their collective capability to coach teacher practice.

The school is proactive in establishing a range of well-considered educational partnerships. Purposeful engagement in the Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako and with other professional and educational agencies focuses on improving outcomes for all children.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The new senior leadership team and trustees are building their collective capability to lead the school’s internal evaluation practices. They are developing shared understanding of their role in promoting equity and excellence.

Collaborative discussion between staff is better identifying individual children’s strengths, needs and progress. Processes used to inquire into the effectiveness of teaching practice continue to improve, including identifying teachers’ development needs and students’ next learning steps.

Further internal evaluation of the effectiveness of the junior school curriculum is required to address disparity in this area and promote sustainable achievement and equity.

School leaders and ERO agree further development is required in some school processes to achieve equity and excellence for all children. These include:

  • strengthening targets to address the disparity in the achievement of boys in writing and plan dependable paths of achievement for students requiring accelerated progress

  • using the school’s internal evaluation process to evaluate the effectiveness of initiatives for accelerating children’s progress and achievement

  • continued implementation of the Progress and Consistency Tool (PaCT) to strengthen the dependability of assessment judgements.

  • achieving consistency of teacher practice to meet the specific needs of children and to facilitate all students’ active involvement in leading their learning.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other learners remains.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

The school has agreed to an internal evaluation workshop to support them to develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all children.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

7 November 2017

About the school

Location

Porirua

Ministry of Education profile number

2928

School type

Contributing Primary (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

168

Gender composition

Male 55%, Female 45%

Ethnic composition

Māori 79%
Pacific 12%
Pākehā 7%
Asian 2%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

July 2017

Date of this report

7 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, June 2014
Education Review, April 2011
Education Review, February 2008