Paraparaumu Beach School - 03/11/2017

Summary

Paraparaumu Beach School is a large primary school for children in Years 1 to 8. The school has an enrolment zone in place. At the time of this ERO evaluation the roll is 682. Māori children make up 16% of the roll.

Since the October 2013 ERO report, there have been changes to the senior leadership team. A new principal and deputy principal have been appointed.

Recently the school has introduced a Bring Your Own Devices (BYOD) digital technology curriculum strategy for children in Years 5 to 8, after extensive consultation with parents and local secondary schools.

Paraparaumu Beach School is a member of the Kapiti North Community of Learning | Kāhui Ako.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Most students continue to achieve at or above National Standards expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. The senior leadership team works positively to promote improvement through building a collaborative culture, to deepen teachers’ knowledge of and responsiveness to learners. Trustees are clearly focused on progressing the school’s vision and priorities.

The Māori Education Plan sets clear expectations for building cultural competence across the school.

School leaders inquire into the effectiveness of their practices with a focus on achieving equitable learning outcomes for children. Teachers are encouraged to explore and inquire into their teaching so that the curriculum is relevant to children.

School performance has been sustained over time through well-focused, embedded processes and practices. This school has successfully addressed in-school disparity in educational outcomes. Agreed next steps are to continue to develop and refine processes, systems and practices for determining progress of children, particularly those whose learning needs to accelerate.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Paraparaumu Beach School effectively responds to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

School data shows that most students achieve at and above National Standards expectations in reading, writing and mathematics. Achievement has been steady over the past four years with no significant dips or rises. The school has identified disparity for a group of boys in writing and has set targets for improvement.

Māori students achieve well. The school identified a group of students whose learning and achievement needed to accelerate in 2016. While most students’ achievement was accelerated, the target was not met. The school has identified strategies and support to continue to lift Māori student achievement. There is a deliberate school focus on supporting Māori children to be successful. The Māori Education Plan sets clear expectations for the school to collaborate with families and whānau. Teachers report progress against the plan, including how teachers’ practice has made a positive impact on children’s learning.

A wide range of strategies and resources support children with additional learning needs. The school works alongside parents and with appropriate agencies to provide support for children. The board funds a high number of teacher aides and programmes in response to needs. Strengthening internal evaluation processes to ascertain the effectiveness of interventions and progress in accelerating and raising student achievement is required.

The senior leadership team and teachers continue to develop assessment practices across the school. Teaching as inquiry is developing. Strengthening moderation practices to ensure consistency of judgements about children’s learning has been prioritised by the school.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school is well placed to continue to promote and achieve equitable and excellent outcomes for children.

The senior leadership team and trustees work collaboratively to progress the school vision and priorities. There is meaningful engagement with the parent community. The school gathers student and community perspectives and is responsive to findings.

Students are well supported to achieve, be confident learners and enjoy a sense of belonging. Collaboration and independence is encouraged. The school leadership team, staff and trustees promote an inclusive, supportive environment for student learning and wellbeing.

There is a considered approach to strengthening acknowledgement of identity, language and culture for Māori students and their families. Aspirations of whānau Māori are sought and valued. This provides useful direction for developing the curriculum, including te reo me ngā tikanga Māori and the significance of local kawa for the school. A school priority is for teachers to continue to grow their cultural competence and ensure outcomes for these students are a deliberate focus and effective.

There is a strong focus on collaboration as leaders and teachers build shared understandings of effectiveness. Professional collaboration supports teachers to explore new practices and approaches to teaching and learning. The appraisal process is consistently implemented, linked to school priorities and responsive to teachers’ strengths and needs.

The curriculum priorities are literacy and mathematics. The school continues to review and develop the curriculum in response to teacher inquiry, children’s strengths and interests. Knowledge of children’s language, culture and identity, along with wellbeing and learning, guide teachers to make good decisions about teaching and learning.

Trustees bring a range of useful skills and knowledge to their roles and support ongoing school developments. They have good processes and systems to undertake their responsibilities. The board receives regular information about school activities. Extensive achievement data is regularly reported. Trustees are clearly focused on how well children are learning and achieving.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The school has many processes in place to promote the achievement of equity and excellence with some further refinements required to some practices.

To assist the board scrutinise and use information more effectively for decision making, senior leaders need to improve the quality of the achievement data presented to trustees. This data should show more clearly the progress of learners whose achievement needs accelerating. Deliberate focus on progress against the goals expressed in the Māori Education Plan should continue to be a priority.

Board and staff should strengthen and consolidate internal evaluation processes. This should assist them to determine the effectiveness of school processes, systems and practices, with a focus on how well these improve and promote positive outcomes for children. Undertaking deeper analysis and inquiry into data should assist staff and leaders to: further develop strategies that support learners to make accelerated progress; monitor to promote greater consistency of practices schoolwide including moderation of children’s work; and coaching and mentoring of staff.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

School performance has been sustained over time through well-focused, embedded processes and practices. This school has successfully addressed in-school disparity in educational outcomes.

Agreed next steps are to continue to develop and refine processes, systems and practices for determining progress for children, particularly those whose learning needs to accelerate.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

3 November 2017

About the school

Location

Paraparaumu Beach

Ministry of Education profile number

2948

School type

Full Primary (Year 1-8)

School roll

682

Gender composition

Female 50%

Male 50%

Ethnic composition

Māori 16%

Pākehā 79%

Pacific 2%

Asian 3%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

August 2017

Date of this report

3 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review October 2013

Education Review May 2009

Education Review May 2006