Sandspit Road School - 06/10/2017

Summary

Sandspit Road School, located in Waiuku, provides education for children from Years 1 to 8. The roll of 335, includes 78 Māori children. There is an increasing number of children from Asian descent attending the school. Since the previous ERO review in 2014, school leadership has remained the same and there have been minimal changes to the teaching team. Teachers have undertaken professional learning and development in the areas of mathematics, spelling and the use of digital technology.

The proportion of Māori children and boys achieving at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics is significantly lower than for other groups of children at the school. Over the last three years this pattern of disparity has widened in writing. At the time of this review there were 11 short-stay international students from China attending the school.

Sandspit Road School is a member of the Waiuku Community of Learners| Kāhui Ako.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is not responding effectively to Māori children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

Processes relating to culturally responsive practice, the school’s curriculum and teaching strategies enable the achievement of equity and excellence.

The school requires further development in the use of achievement information and strengthening leadership for learning. ERO identified the need to strengthen the school’s staff appraisal processes and to review systems related to the enrolment of international students. At the time of this review approximately 80% of students were achieving at or above the National Standards in reading and mathematics. Significantly lower results are evident in writing.

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other learners remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each learner

  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of learners’ progress and achievement

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will:

  • provide feedback and resources to support the development of more targeted planning
  • provide an internal workshop to support the school to develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all learners.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is not responding effectively to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration. The school is yet to specifically target the achievement of children who are at-risk of not achieving the expected National Standard.

Over the past three years, in reading and mathematics, approximately 80% of all students have achieved at or above National Standards. However, levels of achievement in writing have been lower.

The proportion of Māori children achieving at or above the standards is lower than that of other groups in the school. Boys’ achievement has been lower than girls’ achievement. A significant challenge for the school is to reduce the disparity between Māori, boys and other groups of students in the school.

Children with identified learning and/or behaviour needs benefit from the provision of a wide range of programmes and initiatives. This support is effectively managed by an experienced special education needs coordinator (SENCO) who accesses an extensive range of specialist expertise. The school’s achievement data indicates that many of these children make improved progress.

School leaders are continuing to develop processes that support teachers to make reliable judgements in relation to the National Standards.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Processes relating to culturally responsive practice, the school’s curriculum and teaching strategies enable the achievement of equity and excellence for most children.

The school’s curriculum effectively supports children’s wellbeing and engagement. Teachers have positive and affirming relationships with children. ERO observed calm, unhurried class programmes where children actively engage in a wide range of learning experiences. There are many opportunities for children to participate and experience success in a variety of academic, sporting and cultural activities. School values are well known and reflect community aspirations. Children enjoy and benefit from positive and collaborative learning environments.

Some teachers use well-considered strategies and approaches to accelerate children’s achievement. Teachers are willing to explore and trial different initiatives to raise achievement. They increasingly support parents and whānau to become partners in their children’s learning. Teachers are working more collaboratively to share strategies and practice that accelerate progress and achievement. Some teachers are effectively using achievement data to reflect on the effectiveness of their practice. Where these approaches are consistently implemented children’s learning and achievement is enhanced.

Culturally responses practices are more evident within the school. The Pa Kakano leadership team is in the early stages of developing a Māori achievement implementation plan that reflects the aspirations of whānau and Māori learners. This includes expectations for teaching and learning te reo and tikanga Māori. The school has developed useful links with local iwi that are enhancing the use of local Māori contexts in learning programmes. Māori children are encouraged to take leadership roles in a range of Māori and school-wide contexts. Māori children’s sense of wellbeing and belonging at the school is enhanced by the implementation of these culturally responsive practices.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

The school requires further development in the use of achievement information and leadership for learning. The analysis and use of student achievement information requires strengthening.

There is a need for:

  • the board to set specific targets in the annual plan, focused on the number of children whose achievement requires acceleration
  • leaders and teachers to more effectively track, monitor and report the progress of at-risk learners against expected outcomes
  • teachers to plan more responsively to address the needs of identified at-risk learners
  • teachers to implement processes that support children to understand their achievement and next steps for learning
  • trustees and leaders to more effectively use achievement data to evaluate the effectiveness of programmes and initiatives.

Leadership for learning needs to be prioritised. School leaders need to:

  • develop agreed expectations for high quality teaching and learning
  • provide ongoing feedback and feed forward to teachers about their practices
  • target professional learning and development to individual teachers’ needs, and school-wide achievement patterns.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989.

The school has attested that it does not comply with all aspects of the Code.

At the time of this review there were 11 international students attending the school.

ERO’s audit of the school’s implementation of the Code identified significant concerns.

The school has not reviewed, updated and implemented its policies and practices since the introduction of the Code which came into effect on 1 December 2016. The safety and wellbeing of children under 10 placed in homestays does not meet the expectations of the code.

ERO identified non-compliance in relation to staff appraisal

In order to address this the board must implement the school’s policies and procedures for the appraisal of staff. [s 77C State Sector Act 1988]

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other learners remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each learner

  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of learners’ progress and achievement

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate progress for learners

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will:

  • provide feedback and resources to support the development of more targeted planning
  • provide an internal workshop to support the school to develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all learners.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Recommendation

ERO recommends that the New Zealand Qualifications Authority as Administrator of the Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016 follows up with the school about its implementation of the Code, with particular reference to outcome six, safety and wellbeing.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Waikato / Bay of Plenty

6 October 2017

About the school

Location

Waiuku

Ministry of Education profile number

1479

School type

Full Primary (Year 1 to 8)

School roll

335

Gender composition

Boys 56% Girls 44%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā 61%
Māori 22%
Indian 3%
Asian 3%
Other European 2%
Other 9%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

August 2017

Date of this report

6 October 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review June 2014
Education Review May 2011
Education Review May 2008