Shirley Intermediate - 24/05/2017

Summary

Shirley Intermediate School has a roll of 175 children. This includes 45 Māori children and 25 Pacific children. Since the last ERO review (2015) new trustees and a new board chairperson have been appointed. The school has a Limited Statutory Manager in place to support the board in financial and property matters.

Since 2015 the school has focused on building teaching practice and middle leadership capability. Although this has raised the professionalism of teachers, this focus has not led to improved achievement for all children. The school’s appraisal process has been significantly improved and is being implemented in 2017.

End of 2016 achievement information shows low levels of achievement in reading, writing and mathematics. School information shows that these low levels of achievement have been persistent over the last three years.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is not achieving equitable outcomes for all children. Trustees, leaders and teachers need to take more responsibility for and have a greater sense of urgency for raising the achievement and progress of all children.

The school does not have effective practices to evaluate the implementation and the impact of goals, actions and programmes to raise children’s achievement.

At the time of this review, this school was not well placed to provide conditions for children to achieve educational excellence, or to address in-school disparities. The main area of concern is the lack of school-wide focus on lifting achievement levels, especially of those children at risk of poor educational outcomes.

ERO intends to carry out a process of ongoing evaluation to support development over the course of one-to-two years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is not effectively responding to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

Over the last three years children’s achievement in reading, writing and mathematics in relation to National Standards has continued to be low. The school is yet to meet the needs of:

  • Māori learners in mathematics and writing

  • Pacific learners in reading

  • boys in reading and writing.

In 2016 some children were targeted to make accelerated progress in literacy and mathematics. About two thirds of the children targeted made accelerated progress in writing and mathematics, and one third in reading.

The same assessment tools are used school wide to provide reliable achievement information. The school’s expectations for moderation practices are not always used consistently across the school. This means that some assessment information may not be reliable.

The learning of the children in the bilingual class is based on the New Zealand Curriculum, including the related National Standards.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

ERO found evidence of some practices that have been effective in supporting the progress and achievement of children.

Practices that have had a positive impact on children’s learning include:

  • the support that class teachers receive from curriculum leaders

  • teachers and leaders having a greater focus on learning and professional conversations

  • teachers providing children with more authentic writing topics through the meaningful integration of writing into class inquiry-topic studies.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

The school does not consistently use effective practices to plan and implement goals, actions and programmes to raise children’s achievement. Nor does it effectively evaluate the outcomes of actions taken.

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Children’s achievement, progress and learning is not sufficiently prioritised. This is evidenced by:

  • targets not responding sufficiently to all children at risk of underachievement

  • action plans and expectations not being well monitored for leaders and trustees to be assured of consistent implementation

  • leaders and teachers not building strong enough educational relationships with parents and whānau to support children’s learning outcomes

  • leaders not setting and relentlessly pursuing a manageable number of goals and actions that directly relate to accelerating the learning of children at risk of underachievement

  • the board of trustees not receiving school-wide information that clearly shows the sufficiency of progress for all children.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

At the time of this review, this school was not well placed to provide conditions for children to achieve educational excellence, or to address in-school disparities. The main areas of concern are the lack of:

  • school-wide focus on lifting achievement levels, especially of those children whose progress and achievement are at risk

  • sustainability of systems and processes.

Leaders and teachers:

  • have not yet adequately built their knowledge of the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated

  • have not yet adequately established necessary conditions to effectively accelerate learning and achievement

  • are not well placed to achieve and sustain accelerated achievement for all children who need it. 

ERO intends to carry out a process of ongoing evaluation to support development over the course of one-to-two years.

Recommendations

ERO recommends that the Ministry of Education and New Zealand School Trustees Association consider providing support for the school in order to bring about the following improvements:

  • achievement and progress of children

  • planning, evaluating and reporting.

Dr Lesley Patterson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Southern (Te Waipounamu)

24 May 2017

About the school 

Location

Christchurch

Ministry of Education profile number

3503

School type

Intermediate Years 7 & 8

School roll

175

Gender composition

Boys: 54% Girls: 46%

Ethnic composition

Māori: 26%
Pākehā: 49%
Pacific: 14%
Other: 11%

Provision of Māori medium education

Yes

Number of Māori medium classes

1

Total number of students in Māori medium (MME)

26

Total number of students in Māori language in English medium (MLE)

 

Number of students in Level 1 MME

 

Number of students in Level 2 MME

26

Number of students in Level 3 MLE

 

Number of students in Level 4a MLE

 

Number of students in Level 4b MLE

 

Number of students in Level 5 MLE

 

Review team on site

March 2017

Date of this report

24 May 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Reviews:
September 2015
May 2014
April 2011