Taupo Intermediate - 08/08/2017

Summary

Taupo Intermediate provides education for students in Years 7 and 8 from the town of Taupo and surrounding districts. The current roll of 619 includes 215 Māori students. Since the previous ERO review in 2013, there has been a change in the senior leadership team with a new dean being appointed in 2017. The principal has developed an extended leadership team including a dean, curriculum leaders and team leaders to support professional development and build teacher capability.

The board of trustees contains experienced members that reflect the community in which the school is located. Trustees understand their governance role and are committed to improving learner outcomes.

Achievement patterns for Year 7 children at entry shows that the majority are achieving at and some are above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Achievement data from 2014 to 2016 shows overall students make positive progress in reading, writing and mathematics by the end of Year 8. This information also shows disparity for Māori and boys. This is consistent with the achievement challenge for the Taupo School’s Community of Learning (CoL)|Kāhui Ako of which this school is a member.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school is responding well to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration.

Curriculum design, stewardship, internal evaluation, pastoral care, relationships with students, parents and whanau, and culturally responsive contexts for learning, are effective in improving outcomes for learners.

The school has the capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and other children remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each child

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate children’s learning and achievement. 

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

The school has requested that ERO provide them with an internal evaluation workshop.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is responding well to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement needs acceleration.

Curriculum design, stewardship, internal evaluation, pastoral care, relationships with students, parents and whanau, and culturally responsive contexts for learning, are effective in improving outcomes for learners.

Achievement data over the last three years indicates that the majority of children are achieving at the expected National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Overall girls and pākeha children consistently outperform boys and Māori in reading, writing and mathematics. Achievement information shows that at risk learners, including Māori make significant and positive shifts in their achievement in writing and mathematics. Data for the Year 8 cohort is comparable with national expectations in reading, and below in mathematics and writing. The school has responded positively to these trends through ongoing professional learning for teachers in the teaching of writing and mathematics.

Leaders and teachers are developing some sound moderation practices in writing to assist teachers to make overall teacher judgements (OTJs) about each child’s achievement in relation to National Standards. This practice needs to be expanded to reading and mathematics. The school’s involvement in the CoL, including the introduction of the Progress and Consistency Tool (PaCT), is providing opportunities to strengthen moderation processes.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Many processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence for Maori, Pacific and other children.

The school’s curriculum is designed to increasingly respond to the interests, strengths and abilities of the emerging adolescent. Students experience a wide range of learning opportunities and pathways that enable them to engage and enjoy success as learners. These opportunities include specific initiatives to engage boys and Māori learners in physical activities, challenges and leadership. The broad and rich curriculum is contributing to higher levels of student attendance, engagement and learning outcomes. 

Internal evaluation practice is contributing positively to school-wide change and development. Trustees are actively engaged with leaders and teachers in the evaluation of the school’s strategic direction. The charter and targeted action review, development of a formalised review schedule and participation in the Hautu School Trustee Association (STA) culturally responsive practice programme has significantly strengthened internal evaluation within and across the school. This more in-depth approach to internal evaluation is informing decision making and resourcing to support and improve outcomes for all learners particularly those at risk of not achieving.

Effective systems and practices support students’ emotional wellbeing. These practices are underpinned by respectful, caring relationships among teachers and children. Students feel well supported and are able to access specialist internal and external support and guidance when needed. Support staff provide further assistance to children with additional learning and care needs.

There is a strong partnership for learning with parents across the school, particularly for families of those children whose learning is at risk. Effective communication systems enables them to know about their children’s progress and achievement.

Teacher professional learning and development is contributing to improved learning outcomes for children. There is positive alignment between the learning needs of students and priorities for teacher professional development. This is particularly strong in relation to culturally responsive and relational pedagogy, mathematics and more recently in writing. Leaders and teachers are continuing the development of ‘teaching as inquiry’ and are working towards a more integrated and collaborative approach to teaching and curriculum design. The school has a clear focus on improving learner outcomes for their at risk children.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

School-wide systems for use and management of student achievement information in relation to targeted action, leading learning, and building teacher capability require further development.

The school’s approach to targeting and monitoring the achievement and progress of at risk learners is currently under review and yet to be fully implemented. School charter targets need to be more specific and measurable. Leaders need to develop explicit action plans and strategies to accelerate achievement. In addition, they need to more regularly monitor and report on rates of progress for at risk learners and compare this information to other groups of students in the school.

Due to changes to key personnel effective and collaborative leadership of learning is not yet well developed. Middle leaders need to establish clear and shared understanding of their roles as leaders of learning.

There is a need to implement a more strategic approach to building teacher capability that is more specifically focused on accelerating the achievement of at risk learners. Strengthening teacher practice is still a priority in the areas of literacy, mathematics and the use of assessment information. Further development of the school’s appraisal process is also necessary to provide teachers and middle leaders with regular and robust feedback about the effectiveness of their practice and ensure a strong evidential basis for teachers’ appraisal goals.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all children. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and other children remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the children whose learning and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each child

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate children’s learning and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • develop more targeted planning to accelerate learning for children

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and children’s progress

  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

The school has requested that ERO provide them with an internal evaluation workshop. 

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years. 

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer Waikato / Bay of Plenty

8 August 2017

About the school 

Location

Taupo

Ministry of Education profile number

1988

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 and 8)

School roll

619

Gender composition

Girls 50% Boys 50%

Ethnic composition

Pākehā 55%
Māori 35%
Pacific 2%
Other European 3%
Asian 2%
South East Asian 2%
Other 1%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

June 2017

Date of this report

8 August 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review October 2013
Education Review October 2010
Education Review October 2007