Te Uku School - 30/05/2010

1. The Education Review Office (ERO) Evaluation

Te Uku School is located in a rural community 10 km from the township of Raglan. It caters for Years 1 to 8 students and provides its own technology programme for Years 7 and 8 students.

Since the last review the school’s leadership team has changed and extensive consultation has taken place to review and refine the Te Uku School curriculum. Student achievement data is used to set curriculum priorities, inform school goals and design teaching programmes.

The knowledgeable principal is providing visionary, caring leadership. She is well supported by a leadership team that provides professional guidance and support for staff. Skilled teachers are providing high quality learning programmes for students. Professional learning by teachers has had a positive impact on teaching and learning throughout the school. Teachers have a good understanding of self review and this is contributing to the high standard of teaching provided for students.

School data from 2009 indicates that students made good progress in reading, writing and numeracy. By the end of that year a high percentage of students were reading at or above their chronological age and achieving at or above expected levels in numeracy. Results for Māori students were comparable to those of other students.

The school-wide inclusion each year of an Akoranga Māori focus for inquiry learning is promoting student knowledge of te ao Māori (the Māori world). Dedicated teacher aides work with classroom teachers to provide individualised programmes that address students with identified learning needs, such as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) tutorials. A creative and innovative teacher of technology works with Years 7 and 8 students providing high interest experiences that involve students in hands-on activities.

The board of trustees, management and staff have developed a documented, planned approach to self review that includes the systematic collation of information from multiple sources. Such an approach informs decision making related to strategic and annual planning. Trustees demonstrate a high level of commitment to ongoing school improvement, and have sound systems that contribute to a safe environment for students and staff.

Future Action

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four to five years.

2. Te Uku School’s Curriculum

How effectively does the curriculum of Te Uku School promote student learning - engagement, progress and achievement?

School context and self review

Since the last review the composition of the school’s leadership team has changed and extensive consultation has taken place to review and refine the Te Uku School curriculum. Management and teachers are implementing a school curriculum that reflects The New Zealand Curriculum with school values and attitudes linked to the key competencies. Student achievement data is used to inform school goals and design teaching programmes.

School data from 2009 indicates that students made good progress in reading, writing and numeracy. By the end of that year a high percentage of students were reading at or above their chronological age and achieving at or above expected levels in numeracy. Results for Māori students were comparable to those of other students.

The board of trustees, management and staff have developed a documented, planned approach to self review that includes the systematic collation of information from multiple sources. Such an approach informs decision making related to strategic and annual planning.

Areas of strength

Leadership: The knowledgeable principal is providing visionary, caring leadership. She is well supported by a leadership team that provides professional guidance and support for staff. The focused leadership approach by the principal:

  • builds on staff strengths;
  • develops a climate of professionalism; and
  • encourages reflective practices.

School leadership under the direction of the principal is providing clear direction for ongoing development and systematic school improvement.

Community partnership: There is a strong partnership between the school and its parent community. Aspects of this partnership include:

  • effective communication and consultation;
  • the contribution that the whānau group makes to school life and teaching programmes; and
  • parents feeling welcome to visit the school and being comfortable in approaching staff.

These relationships contribute to students’ feelings of confidence and security.

School culture. The positive and constructive school culture is focused on building citizenship through their school vision ‘expanding hearts and minds’. Students’ high levels of engagement are fostered through:

  • promoting the key dimensions of resilience, responsibility and relationships;
  • empowering students in their learning; and
  • teachers adopting a holistic style of teaching.

Students co-operate with one another and tuakana teina relationships are evident in the classroom and playground.

Teaching and learning: Skilled teachers are providing high quality learning programmes for students. Professional learning programmes attended by teachers have had a positive impact on teaching and learning throughout the school. Classroom environments are designed to support learning and students’ work is well displayed. Charts and prompts reinforce students’ ability to take responsibility for their learning. Teacher planning, assessment and evaluation reflect the teaching content and an approach that motivates and challenges students to build on their prior knowledge.

The school-wide inclusion each year of an Akoranga Māori focus for inquiry learning is promoting student knowledge of te ao Māori. Students regularly use te reo Māori in classrooms and teachers are participating in ongoing professional development that enables them to use the skills and knowledge of the school’s Māori whānau.

Early intervention programmes are available for students requiring extra support in their learning. Dedicated teacher aides work with classroom teachers to provide individualised programmes to address identified learning needs including English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) tutorials. A creative and innovative teacher of technology works with Year 7 and 8 students providing high interest experiences that involve students in hands on activities.

Self review: Strong self-review processes have been established to gather and evaluate information about school progress and student achievement. Extensive consultation has taken place to review and refine the Te Uku School curriculum. Student achievement data is used to prioritise curriculum priorities, inform school goals and design teaching programmes. Teachers have a good understanding of self review and this is contributing to the high standard of teaching provided for students.

Area for development and review

School curriculum: The next stage for school improvement is to continue developing the school curriculum to best address the particular needs, interests and circumstances of the school, for its students and community.

3. Board Assurance on Legal Requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of Te Uku School completed an ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal obligations related to:

  • board administration;
  • curriculum;
  • management of health, safety and welfare;
  • personnel management;
  • financial management; and
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on students’ achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment);
  • physical safety of students;
  • teacher registration;
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions; and
  • attendance.

ERO’s investigations did not identify any areas of concern.

4. Future Action

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four to five years.

Richard Thornton

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

28 May 2010

About The School

School type

Full primary (Years 1 to 8)

Decile1

5

School roll

160

Gender composition

Boys 51%

Girls 49%

Ethnic composition

New Zealand European/Pākehā 63%

New Zealand Māori 29%

South East Asian 2%

Other 6%

Review team on site

April 2010

Date of this report

28 May 2010

Previous three ERO reports

Education Review Report 2007

Education Review 2004

Accountability Review 2001

 

28 May 2010

To the Parents and Community of Te Uku School

These are the findings of the Education Review Office’s latest report on Te Uku School.

Te Uku School is located in a rural community 10 km from the township of Raglan. It caters for Years 1 to 8 students and provides its own technology programme for Years 7 and 8 students.

Since the last review the school’s leadership team has changed and extensive consultation has taken place to review and refine the Te Uku School curriculum. Student achievement data is used to set curriculum priorities, inform school goals and design teaching programmes.

The knowledgeable principal is providing visionary, caring leadership. She is well supported by a leadership team that provides professional guidance and support for staff. Skilled teachers are providing high quality learning programmes for students. Professional learning by teachers has had a positive impact on teaching and learning throughout the school. Teachers have a good understanding of self review and this is contributing to the high standard of teaching provided for students.

School data from 2009 indicates that students made good progress in reading, writing and numeracy. By the end of that year a high percentage of students were reading at or above their chronological age and achieving at or above expected levels in numeracy. Results for Māori students were comparable to those of other students.

The school-wide inclusion each year of an Akoranga Māori focus for inquiry learning is promoting student knowledge of te ao Māori (the Māori world). Dedicated teacher aides work with classroom teachers to provide individualised programmes that address students with identified learning needs, such as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) tutorials. A creative and innovative teacher of technology works with Years 7 and 8 students providing high interest experiences that involve students in hands-on activities.

The board of trustees, management and staff have developed a documented, planned approach to self review that includes the systematic collation of information from multiple sources. Such an approach informs decision making related to strategic and annual planning. Trustees demonstrate a high level of commitment to ongoing school improvement, and have sound systems that contribute to a safe environment for students and staff.

Future Action

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four to five years.

Review Coverage

This report provides an evaluation of how effectively the school’s curriculum promotes student learning - engagement, progress and achievement. ERO’s evaluation takes account of the school’s previous reporting history and is based on:

  • what is known about student achievement information, including the achievement of Māori and Pacific students;
  • decisions made to improve student achievement using assessment and selfreview information; and
  • teaching strategies and programmes implemented to give effect to the school’s curriculum.

ERO also gathers information during the review to contribute to its national reports. The national reports are published on ERO’s website.

If you would like a copy of the full report, please contact the school or see the ERO website, www.ero.govt.nz.

Richard Thornton

National Manager Review Services

Northern Region

General Information about Reviews

About ERO

ERO is an independent, external evaluation agency that undertakes reviews of schools and early childhood services throughout New Zealand.

About ERO Reviews

ERO follows a set of standard procedures to conduct reviews. The purpose of each review is to:

  • improve educational achievement in schools; and
  • provide information to parents, communities and the government.

Reviews are intended to focus on student achievement and build on each school’s self review.

Review Focus

ERO’s framework for reviewing and reporting integrates the following:

  • school curriculum;
  • national evaluation topics –contribute to the development of education policies and their effective implementation; and
  • Board Assurance Statement, including student and staff health and safety.

ERO’s review is responsive to the school’s context. When ERO reviews a school, it takes into account the characteristics of the community from which it draws its students, its aspirations for its young people, and other relevant local factors.

ERO also builds on the school’s own self-review information. ERO is interested in how a school monitors the progress of its students and aspects of school life and culture, and how it uses this information to improve student learning.

This helps ERO to answer the major evaluation question for reviews:

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote student learning - engagement, progress and achievement?

Areas for Development and Review

ERO reports include areas for development and review to support on-going improvement by identifying priorities. Often the school will have identified these matters through its own self review and already plans further development in those areas.

1 School deciles range from one to ten. Decile one schools  draw their students from low socioeconomic communities and at the other end of the range, decile 10 schools draw their students from high socio-economic communities. Deciles are used to provide funding to state and state integrated schools. The lower the school’s decile the more funding it receives. A school’s decile is in no way linked to the quality of education it provides.