Victory Primary School - 23/12/2014

Findings

Victory School provides an inclusive, caring environment for its multicultural students and families/whānau. Students are able to be educated through the English or Māori languages. The board and staff make effective use of good quality resources to benefit students’ learning. The school is focusing on increasing the involvement of parents and whānau in their children’s learning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

1. Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Students learn in a caring and inclusive environment where their wellbeing is strongly nurtured by the staff and board of trustees. Parents and members of the school’s multicultural community have many opportunities to participate in and contribute to the school’s programmes.

The board and staff continue to maintain close ties with other community services sharing the Victory Urban Village campus. Facilities are available for before and after-school care, a kōhanga reo, a community centre for several social agencies and for new New Zealanders to socialise and learn the English language together.

Students are able to learn through either English-Medium or Māori-Medium programmes. A significant number of students are being supported to learn English or te reo Māori.

Apart from the appointment of a new principal in June 2014, there have been few changes in staffing.

The school has had a positive reporting history. The board and staff have built on the school’s strengths outlined in ERO’s December 2009 report.

2. Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

The school makes effective use of achievement information to promote student engagement, progress and achievement.

In the English-Medium classes, well-analysed information reported to the board, shows that many students make significant progress in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. After two years at school, students make considerable progress in reading and writing, as a result of specific one-on-one teaching, effective and targeted learning support and small classes.

After four years in the Māori-Medium classes students have acquired a good level of proficiency in te reo Māori. Most of these students achieve at or above Ngā Whanaketanga Rūmaki Māori (the Māori National Standards) in writing. Students who are learning English language or have specific learning or special needs are well supported by their teachers and the learning support staff.

Students are becoming more involved in their learning. They set their own goals and know what they are trying to achieve. They are becoming more familiar with how well they are achieving or progressing in relation to the National Standards.

Teachers have high expectations for students’ learning and behaviour. They provide stimulating environments that engage students in their learning. Teachers are reflective about their teaching and use research to support or enhance the ways they teach. They identify and share the strategies they use that effectively keep students fully involved in their learning.

The senior leaders and teachers have developed good systems for monitoring and tracking students’ progress. They now need to:

  • review the quality and quantity of student school reports
  • make sure the content of board reports are sufficiently clear to support trustees in making planning and resourcing decisions.

The board and senior leaders have identified strengthening relationships with the Pacific families and communities as an important part of their ongoing support for Pacific children.

3. Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

The school’s English-Medium and Māori-Medium Curricula strongly promote and support student learning and progress. They are well designed to reflect the school’s priorities for their students. Students learn in meaningful contexts that reflect their interests, cultural experiences and abilities.

The Māori-Medium curriculum provides a good model of how Māori values and perspectives are woven across the programmes. Parents’ and students’ aspirations and teacher expectations have been collaboratively used to develop the Graduate Profile for their tuakana (Year 6) students.

The senior leaders are working with staff to complete the review of the English-Medium curriculum by considering complementary values and a graduate profile similar to the Māori-Medium’s model.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The school effectively promotes educational success for Māori, as Māori. A strength of the school is the way te ao Māori is successfully woven throughout all aspects of school life. All students have opportunities to:

  • experience positive relationships with their peers and teachers
  • learn te reo and tikanga Māori
  • experience Māori perspectives in natural ways.

Teachers demonstrate their respect for, and value of Māori students’ culture, language and heritage. They show a commitment to increasing their own learning in te reo and tikanga Māori. Māori staff provide high quality support to their non-Māori colleagues.

The senior leaders and staff have been updating the school’s curriculum. They have identified that their next steps are to review the school’s values to make sure they more closely reflect the school’s expectations for teaching and learning and to embed the newly-developed cycle for curriculum review and reporting.

4. Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

The school is very well placed to sustain and improve its performance. The board has a good balance of experienced and new members. They work well with the principal to set the direction for the school and monitor the progress the school makes toward achieving its strategic goals.

The board provides strong support for the principal , staff and students. They make good provision for parents families/whānau to be involved in the life of the school and to contribute to the decision-making about school programmes.

The board has been updating its policies and procedures and acknowledges that these need to be completed and shared with the school’s community.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Victory School provides an inclusive, caring environment for its multicultural students and families/whānau. Students are able to be educated through the English or Māori languages. The board and staff make effective use of good quality resources to benefit students’ learning. The school is focusing on increasing the involvement of parents and whānau in their children’s learning.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four-to-five years.

Graham Randell

National Manager Review Services

Southern Region

23 December 2014

About the School

Location

Nelson

Ministry of Education profile number

3231

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

409

Gender composition

Boys 53%

Girls 47%

Ethnic composition

Māori

NZ European/Pākehā

Pacific

Asian

Other European

37%

27%

4%

28%

4%

Special Features

Five Māori-Medium classes

Review team on site

November 2014

Date of this report

23 December 2014

Most recent ERO reports

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

December 2009

August 2006

June 2003