Wainuiomata Intermediate - 07/11/2017

Summary

Wainuiomata Intermediate is a multicultural school catering for 272 students in Years 7 and 8. Most attending are Māori or Pākehā, with 11% identifying as of Pacific heritage.

A bilingual class, Te Kahui Tamariki, provides opportunities for some students to learn through higher levels of te reo Māori. Six technology classrooms support curriculum integration and enrichment.

Since the October 2014 ERO report, two new deputy principals and several staff have been appointed. Three new trustees were elected recently. Property developments include: a communityfunded gymnasium; the re-furbishment of the community-funded school hall, assisting the focus on sport and physical education; and the modernisation of one classroom block.

Professional development in the past three years has focused on building teachers’ cultural competence and capability in te ao Māori, and effectiveness in teaching literacy and mathematics. The current priorities are on restorative practices and building student ownership of learning.

The school works with others in the Wainuiomata Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako to promote effective practices, raise student achievement and improve students’ transitions between schools.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

The school achieves equitable outcomes in most aspects of student achievement. However, they have yet to reduce the disparity in achievement between girls and boys in writing.

Around 70% of learners achieve at or above in relation to National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics.

School leaders are strongly focused on developing collaborative and culturally responsive practices. Teachers have revisited the beliefs that underpin the curriculum. Student ownership and control of their learning and a significant focus on the integration of te reo me ngā tikanga Māori are key parts of the new direction.

Many schoolwide systems and processes have been strengthened since the previous ERO review.

Children are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school continues to strengthen its approach to supporting students whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

At the end of 2016, the school reported that approximately 70% of students achieved at or above in relation to the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. There was little disparity between ethnic groups. A consistent pattern of achievement is evident over the past three years.

Leaders have put steps in place to address the lower achievement of boys in writing. These students have been appropriately identified as priorities in the 2017 school targets.

Students at risk of low achievement are quickly identified. They have their needs recognised and programmes of support put in place. Their achievement is regularly assessed and reported to trustees and whānau. Some make accelerated progress. However, the current recording and tracking practices do not always give a clear picture of students’ rate of progress throughout the year. The impact of processes to support these students has yet to be fully evaluated.

Students with additional needs are well supported.

Teachers have a shared understanding of current assessment tools and practices. They use an appropriate range of tools to gather and collate individual and schoolwide student achievement information. The dependability of their judgements against National Standards in reading and mathematics has been strengthened and are well developed for writing.

The school has a wide view of student achievement. Its valued outcomes include developing confident, respectful students who are proud of their school and supportive of their peers. These are evident throughout the school.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

The school has a number of practices that are effective in supporting students whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

Students experience a broad, inclusive and culturally responsive curriculum with a strong and appropriate focus on literacy and mathematics. Specialist teachers deliver programmes in technology, the arts and music. There is an increased emphasis on provision of opportunities that: integrate learning areas; are situated in authentic contexts; and are personalized to the learner. Students have the opportunity to be placed in a class where te reo me ngā tikanga Māori are a focus.

Students are challenged and supported to succeed in calm, responsive learning environments and they are encouraged to take increasing responsibility for their own learning. They have opportunities to pursue individual interests and strengths. Many are able to talk meaningfully about their levels of achievement and key next steps for their learning. Learning environments are attractive and wellresourced.

A collegial team approach between teachers, leaders and students is very evident. Respectful interactions and positive relationships support collaboration. Students have an active and ongoing role in running aspects of school operation. They are regularly surveyed for their opinions and their ideas are valued.

Teachers are reflective and focused on student wellbeing and success. A range of appropriate pastoral care initiatives is in place to cater for students’ social, emotional and health needs.

There are clear expectations that teachers will learn how to improve their teaching practice by investigating the effectiveness of their teaching, collaborating with colleagues, and participating in schoolwide professional development programmes.

Leaders provide useful guidance for improving student achievement. Ongoing review has resulted in a comprehensive and coherent curriculum document that guides delivery and sets clear, high expectations for teaching practice. There is a focus on improvement and the development of shared understanding of effective teaching strategies.

Leaders and trustees are committed to the school’s vision and values. They seek to actively involve the Māori community. The Pacific community is heavily involved in developing initiatives to support students and their families.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Leaders support a range of initiatives to improve student outcomes. In order to get the greatest benefits from these they should:

  • refocus school targets on accelerating the progress of those students at risk of not achieving

  • consider ways to more effectively track and monitor the rate of progress of these students at regular intervals throughout the year

  • evaluate the impact of the multiple initiatives in place to improve student outcomes.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • finance

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Provision for international students

The school is a signatory to the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students (the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. No international students were enrolled at the time of the ERO review.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Learners are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes, supported by effective, sustainable processes and practices.

Agreed next steps are to:

  • refocus school targets on accelerating the progress of those students at risk of not achieving and to track and monitor the rate of progress of these students at regular intervals throughout the year

  • evaluate the impact of initiatives in place to improve student outcomes.

ERO will provide an internal evaluation workshop in response to a request from the school.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

7 November 2017

About the school

Location

Lower Hutt

Ministry of Education profile number

1646

School type

Intermediate (Years 7 to 8)

School roll

272

Gender composition

Male 51 %, Female 49 %

Ethnic composition

Māori 46%
Pākehā 38%
Pacific 11%
Other ethnic groups 5%

Provision of Māori medium education

1 bilingual class

Review team on site

September 2017

Date of this report

7 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review, October 2014
Education Review, September 2011
Education Review, August 2008