Wellington College - 27/10/2009

Community Page

27 October 2009

To the Parents and Community of Wellington College

These are the findings of the Education Review Office's latest report on Wellington College.

Wellington College is located close to the centre of the city. At the time of this review in August 2009, it had a roll of 1533 students, five percent of whom were Māori and a further five percent were of Pacific cultures. The college culture of high achievement effectively blends its heritage and tradition with innovative teaching and learning. It is a thriving community.

Students achieve high levels of success in many areas including a wide range of sports, music and drama. A school haka has been composed and is increasingly used to engender a sense of identity and unity among the college community. Results in the National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEAs) are consistently above national and decile comparisons and have been improving in the last three years. In 2008, 59 students were awarded 115 New Zealand Scholarships across 19 subjects. This record of consistent outstanding success places Wellington College students amongst the highest achievers in the country.

Members of the Board of Trustees bring professional expertise and knowledge to their roles. Many have multiple associations with the college, as former students and parents. Trustees have a sound understanding of governance.

The headmaster and senior leadership team have a high profile throughout the college community. Collectively they are effective in nurturing the aspirations and dreams of students and staff. Students appreciate the many and varied opportunities that are made available to them, and staff acknowledge the fulsome support they receive to advance their subject specific knowledge and teaching expertise. Students express pride in the college and display a sense of ownership and belonging. Those spoken with by ERO state they feel physically and emotionally safe.

There is high quality teaching throughout the college. Teachers regularly engage in professional discussions to improve students' learning. This is evident in, for example: the range and scope of digital learning opportunities; the adoption of a school-wide template for inquiry learning developed in consultation with contributing schools; feedback and discussion with the specialist classroom teacher following class observations; and voluntary professional development gatherings to share and discuss approaches to teaching and learning.

Improvement and accountability are understood to be the key purposes of self review. Internal evaluation is used to effectively inform decision making and improvements, such as the department reviews introduced in 2008. Self review includes increasing use of student focus groups to provide their view of planned change. Many staff actively promote self review in classrooms. Students are encouraged to reflect on each others' learning. They are given, and accept, high levels of responsibility.

Senior managers and staff are aware that improvements need to be made in the way achievement data are used to track student progress over time and in setting priorities within planned whole-school professional development. As the strategic plan is due for renewal, it is timely to extend its structure to create a framework that effectively links the many and varied self-review processes through articulating clear statements of intended learning outcomes at all levels of the college.

The board responded positively to the findings of this review and has developed a recommendation to help guide continuing school improvement.

Future Action

ERO is very confident that the board of trustees can govern the school in the interest of the students and the Crown and bring about the improvements outlined in this report. ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four to five years.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews do not cover every aspect of school performance and each ERO report may cover different issues. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to student achievement and useful to this school.

If you would like a copy of the full report, please contact the school or see the ERO website, www.ero.govt.nz.

Dr Graham Stoop

Chief Review Officer

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT REVIEWS

About ERO

ERO is an independent, external evaluation agency that undertakes reviews of schools and early childhood services throughout New Zealand.

About ERO Reviews

ERO follows a set of standard procedures to conduct reviews. The purpose of each review is to:

  • improve educational achievement in schools; and
  • provide information to parents, communities and the Government.

Reviews are intended to focus on student achievement and build on each school's self review.

Review Focus

ERO's framework for reviewing and reporting is based on three review strands.

  • School Specific Priorities - the quality of education and the impact of school policies and practices on student achievement.
  • Areas of National Interest - information about how Government policies are working in schools.
  • Compliance with Legal Requirements - assurance that this school has taken all reasonable steps to meet legal requirements.

Review Coverage

ERO reviews do not cover every aspect of school performance and each ERO report may cover different issues. The aim is to provide information on aspects that are central to student achievement and useful to this school.

Review Recommendations

Most ERO reports include recommendations for improvement. A recommendation on a particular issue does not necessarily mean that a school is performing poorly in relation to that issue. There is no direct link between the number of recommendations in this report and the overall performance of this school.

1. About the School

Location

Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

275

School type

Boys’ State Secondary School (Years 9–13)

Teaching staff:

Roll generated entitlement

Other

Number of teachers

 

91.27

3.00

95

School roll

1533

Number of international students

97

Gender composition

Boys 100%

Ethnic composition

New Zealand European/Päkehä 69%

South East Asian 6%

Mäori 5%

Chinese 5%

Other European 5%

Pacific 5%

Indian 4%

African 1%

Review team on site

August 2009

Date of this report

27 October 2009

Previous ERO reports

Education Review October 2006

Education Review August 2002

Effectiveness Review May 1997

Assurance Audit August 1994

Review November 1991


2. The Education Review Office (ERO) Evaluation

Māori and a further five percent were of Pacific culturesWellington College is located close to the centre of the city. At the time of this review in August 2009, it had a roll of 1533 students, five percent of whom were. The college culture of high achievement effectively blends its heritage and tradition with innovative teaching and learning. It is a thriving community.

Students achieve high levels of success in many areas including a wide range of sports, music and drama. A school haka has been composed and is increasingly used to engender a sense of identity and unity among the college community. Results in the National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEAs) are consistently above national and decile comparisons and have been improving in the last three years. In 2008, 59 students were awarded 115 New Zealand Scholarships across 19 subjects. This record of consistent outstanding success places Wellington College students amongst the highest achievers in the country.

Members of the Board of Trustees bring professional expertise and knowledge to their roles. Many have multiple associations with the college, as former students and parents. Trustees have a sound understanding of governance.

The headmaster and senior leadership team have a high profile throughout the college community. Collectively they are effective in nurturing the aspirations and dreams of students and staff. Students appreciate the many and varied opportunities that are made available to them, and staff acknowledge the fulsome support they receive to advance their subject specific knowledge and teaching expertise. Students express pride in the college and display a sense of ownership and belonging. Those spoken with by ERO state they feel physically and emotionally safe.

There is high quality teaching throughout the college. Teachers regularly engage in professional discussions to improve students’ learning. This is evident in, for example: the range and scope of digital learning opportunities; the adoption of a school-wide template for inquiry learning developed in consultation with contributing schools; feedback and discussion with the specialist classroom teacher following class observations; and voluntary professional development gatherings to share and discuss approaches to teaching and learning.

Improvement and accountability are understood to be the key purposes of self review. Internal evaluation is used to effectively inform decision making and improvements, such as the department reviews introduced in 2008. Self review includes increasing use of student focus groups to provide their view of planned change. Many staff actively promote self review in classrooms. Students are encouraged to reflect on each others’ learning. They are given, and accept, high levels of responsibility.

Senior managers and staff are aware that improvements need to be made in the way achievement data are used to track student progress over time and in setting priorities within planned whole-school professional development. As the strategic plan is due for renewal, it is timely to extend its structure to create a framework that effectively links the many and varied self-review processes through articulating clear statements of intended learning outcomes at all levels of the college.

The board responded positively to the findings of this review and has developed a recommendation to help guide continuing school improvement.

Future Action

ERO is very confident that the board of trustees can govern the school in the interest of the students and the Crown and bring about the improvements outlined in this report. ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four to five years.

3. The Focus of the Review

Student Achievement Overall

ERO’s education reviews focus on student achievement. What follows is a statement about what the school knows about student achievement overall.

The National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEAs) are New Zealand’s official national qualification for secondary school students and part of the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).

ERO evaluates the use made of student achievement information available from those qualifications, and actual student achievement within the framework.

The college’s annual analysis tracks results in the NCEAs over time and compares them with those for schools of a similar decile using New Zealand Qualifications Authority data. This shows high levels of success across three levels of the NCEAs and New Zealand Scholarship. Results are consistently higher than national comparisons.

The achievement of year 11 students entered for Level 1 has increased from 82.2% in 2006 to 84.1% in 2008. This was 10% above comparison with schools of similar decile three years ago and was 12.2% above in 2008.

At Level 2, while the proportion of year 12 students gaining Level 2 increased between 2006 and 2007 from 75.7% to 82.2% and then dropped in 2008 to 80.9%, these results have improved from 2.8% above those of schools of a similar decile in 2006 to 9.3% above in 2007 and 10.5% above in 2008.

This trend continues at Level 3, where the proportion of year 13 students gaining success has increased from 69.3% in 2006 to 75.8% in 2008, an improvement from 4.2% to 11.2 % above decile comparisons. The majority of credits gained in NCEAs are in achievement standards.

New Zealand Scholarship results have also continued to rise over the last three years from 92 in 2006, to 115 in 2008, of which 19 were at outstanding level. The 2008 data indicate that 59 students were awarded scholarships in 19 different subjects. This record of consistent outstanding success places Wellington College students amongst the highest achievers in the country.

Overall, Mäori student achievement in the NCEAs is equal to that of schools of a similar type and decile nationally, but below that of their peers within the college. There has been an increase in the percentage of Māori students achieving NCEA Level 1 since 2006. NCEA results for Pacific students follow a similar trend and are generally higher than national comparisons but not as high as other groups at the college.

Assessment Tools for Teaching and Learning (asTTle) data in 2008 for students in year 9 show that in February the majority were reading close to the national average for the test and by November were well above it. There had been a significant improvement in students’ understanding of how to find information to answer specific questions but none, at this stage, in their ability to relate information to hypothetical contexts. This pattern was also apparent in results for the 2009 year 9 intake. However, there was less variation between the highest and lowest scores for the college than for scores reported nationally.

AsTTle data in mathematics for the same group in 2009 indicate that at the start of the year, students were below national comparisons for the test but their attitude towards the subject was considerably higher.

These data indicate the progress the college helps students make as they move through to the senior school. Percentages of year 11 students gaining the minimum NCEA Level 1 literacy and numeracy requirements are high. For example, in 2007, 90.9% of year 11 students gained the minimum literacy credits for NCEA Level 1 in contrast to 70.8% of students in schools of a similar type and decile. Figures in mathematics for the same period are 96.9% and 75% respectively.

Achievement in other curriculum areas is reported in annual department reports to the board and individually to parents.

School Specific Priorities

Wellington CollegeBefore the review, the board ofwas invited to consider its priorities for review using guidelines and resources provided by ERO. ERO also used documentation provided by the school to contribute to the scope of the review.

Wellington CollegeThe detailed priorities for review were then determined following a discussion between the ERO review team and the board of trustees. This discussion focused on existing information held by the school (including student achievement and self‑review information) and the extent to which potential issues for review contributed to the achievement of the students at.

ERO and the board have agreed on the following focus areas for the review:

  • the quality of self review.

ERO’s findings in this area are set out below.

The Quality of Self Review

Background

The recommendations arising from ERO’s 2006 review were to further develop the collection, sharing and use of assessment information to support a range of college operations. These included board and departmental planning, implementation of differentiated teaching and learning, the generation of a school-wide picture of progress and achievement in years 9 and 10 and the evaluation of programme and whole-school effectiveness as part of evidence-based self review. In consultation with the board prior to this review, ERO agreed to evaluate the quality of self review and its impact on teaching and learning.

Since 2006, there have been several staff changes. Nine heads of department, three staff in pastoral positions, a fourth deputy principal in 2008, and an e-learning director in 2009 have been appointed.

Information for this report was gathered by reading relevant documentation, observing in classrooms and speaking with school personnel and students.

Areas of good performance

  • Improvement and accountability are understood to be the key purposes of self review. Clear expectations and procedures guide college processes. Action plans and progress reports are integral to department reviews. Staff continue to constructively engage in addressing the findings of ERO’s 2006 review. There is a culture of high expectations and striving for success amongst staff and students.
  • The board generously funds internal review. External advice has been sought in the review of the strategic plan and the job descriptions of senior managers. Department reviews include use of external consultants. A part-time systems manager was appointed in 2007. Self review is an established college practice to find ways to better meet students’ needs.
  • Reviews effectively inform decision making and improvements. For example:
  • the cycle of department reviews introduced in 2008 has led to changes in department documentation and the further use of student focus groups in college developments;
  • annual department reports that include analysis and reporting of senior student achievement. These provide commentary on changing course provisions within subject areas based on student achievement data; and
  • the formation of the curriculum leaders group in 2009 which reviewed the junior school curriculum leading to changes in the timetable structure for implementation in 2010.

Teachers, as part of reflective practice, regularly engage in professional discussions to improve students’ learning. This is evident in:

  • feedback and discussion with the specialist classroom teacher following class observations;
  • the development of learner profiles with extensive community consultation;
  • adopting a school-wide template for inquiry learning developed in consultation with contributing schools to support consistent use of this process;
  • extending the range and scope of digital learning opportunities;
  • mentoring of first-time heads of department by senior managers;
  • continuing discussion about how to extend understanding of, and provision for, gifted and talented students;
  • an effective advice and guidance programme for beginning teachers; and
  • voluntary professional development gatherings to share and discuss approaches to teaching and learning.

Students are actively engaged and achieve well in the classes of these effective, responsive practitioners. There is an observable relationship between teacher reflection and the high quality of practice.

  • A culture of self review is apparent in many classrooms. Students are encouraged to reflect on each other’s work through peer review, online collaboration using the learning management system, wikis and weblogs, cooperative learning and self assessment against specific criteria. Staff are actively engaged in promoting this collaborative approach to teaching.
  • The college’s effective communication network supports internal review. Issues raised in one forum are picked up and developed in others. Staff professional development activities and agendas are filed on the learning management system for reference and further reflection. The smooth flow of information underpins the whole-school focus on improvement.

Areas for improvement

Senior managers and staff are aware that improvements need to be made in:

  • using asTTle data to inform teaching and learning beyond the immediate areas of English and mathematics;
  • tracking student achievement over time, particularly in years 9 and 10, and clarifying the use of grades to indicate progress against curriculum levels in reports of students’ learning to parents; and
  • targeting professional development to address priorities for school improvement and monitoring its impact on student achievement.

ERO agrees. As the strategic plan is due for renewal, it is timely to extend its structure to create a framework that effectively aligns all college review processes. For example, links are not always clear between:

  • department goal setting, annual reports and triennial reviews;
  • individual professional development and assessment cycle goals and feedback on classroom observations; and
  • spontaneous reviews and formal reporting.

Clearly articulating priorities and expected outcomes in a coordinated plan is likely to assist review of the impact of initiatives on student learning and achievement at all levels of the college.

4. Areas of National Interest

Overview

ERO provides information about the education system as a whole to Government to be used as the basis for long-term and systemic educational improvement. ERO also provides information about the education sector for schools, parents and the community through its national reports.

To do this ERO decides on topics and investigates them for a specific period in all applicable schools nationally.

Wellington CollegeDuring the review ofERO investigated and reported on the following areas of national interest. The findings are included in this report so that information about the school is transparent and widely available.

Success for Māori Students: Progress

In this review, ERO evaluated the extent to which the school was familiar with the Māori Education Strategy – Ka Hikitia: Managing for Success and progress made since the 2006 review in promoting success at school for Māori students.

The college reports it has takenKa Hikitiainto account when revising planning documents for this year. Eighty one students identify as Māori, five percent of the roll.

Areas of progress

  • The board and senior management team demonstrate a strong commitment to Māori students and their whānau. This is evident in Māori representation on the board, representatives of whānau, senior management and students working in close collaboration with trustees through Te Piringa meetings and strategic and annual plans that express objectives for Māori student success. Progress and achievement of senior Māori students are regularly reported.
  • Whānau are taking increasing responsibility and leadership in the college. They work actively with senior staff to bring about improvements for Māori. For example, waka ama, kapa haka, mentoring students to support achievement and work in the development of the college marae. The involvement of whānau is enriching the college’s cultural climate.
  • Student achievement data show that at all levels of the NCEAs Māori students are achieving at equivalent levels to Māori students in schools of similar type and decile but lower than their college peers. Since 2006, there has been an increase in the percentage of Māori students achieving NCEA Level 1. However, Level 2 and 3 achievements fluctuate.
  • Te reo Māori me ōna tikanga is promoted throughout the school. Whanaungatanga is encouraged and whakapapa is acknowledged and celebrated. Interactions between students, whānau and staff are warm, positive and mutually respectful. Students are encouraged to take leadership roles in pōwhiri which are becoming integral to college protocol. Māori students feel a strong sense of belonging in the college.
  • Māori developments throughout the college are effectively led by the head of department, Māori. He provides advice, guidance and professional development to the staff on te reo Māori me ōna tikanga, pastoral support of Māori students and liaison with Te Piringa. During te wiki o te reo Māori, the head of department and students worked with teachers on basic language structures and pronunciation. This continues to have a significant impact on the morale and self esteem for those students involved. It is an appropriate expression of ako and tuakana teina in action. Students are proud to be Māori and support Māori activities throughout the college.
  • Students are well supported in their learning of te reo Māori. Immersion sessions have been introduced to year 9 and 10 te reo Māori classes providing opportunities for students with high levels of competency to be extended while also supporting those who are new to learning te reo Māori. Capable students in year 13 are enrolled in stage one university courses. Senior students continue to have opportunities to meet with the headmaster to discuss their goals and progress.
  • Raising the positive profile of Māori within the college is a priority. Plans for the development of a whare have been approved by the board which will locate the Māori department in a central and visible space within the school. A school haka has been composed and is being increasingly used to engender a sense of identity and unity among the college community. Many curriculum programmes include Māori contexts within the course content. Assemblies held for Māori and Pacific students are a public forum for celebrating cultural, sporting and academic success. Taonga presented to the college during the ANZAC day celebrations are prominently displayed in the library.

Areas for further improvement

  • Te Piringa and senior leaders are aware, and ERO agrees, that there is a need to improve the long-term sustainability of whānau participation at a range of levels in the college and the progress towards strategic goals.
  • Raising Māori student achievement is not widely reflected in department annual plans and goal setting. The reporting of Māori student achievement within department annual reports is limited. Conversations have begun and this is likely to support improved outcomes for Māori students.

The Achievement of Pacific Students: Progress

In this review ERO evaluated the progress the college has made since ERO’s 2006 review in improving the achievement of its Pacific students and in initiatives designed to promote improved achievement. Pacific students from Samoa, the Cook Islands, Tonga, Tokelau, Niue and Fiji make up five percent of the college roll.

Areas of good performance

  • College leadership has a clear focus on promoting Pacific achievement. A member of the senior management team has overall responsibility for monitoring programmes that meet the needs of this group. A Pacific academic support person, along with the headmaster, mentors Pacific students and monitors their progress. The school chaplain works closely with the academic support person to provide for these students’ pastoral needs. The ‘Together as Brothers’ student leadership group and Māori/Pacific assemblies focus on building boys’ motivation and aspirations, and on raising their confidence, through regular meetings, with successful role models as guest speakers. Pacific students are well supported through a range of initiatives.
  • NCEA results for Pacific students are better than for their peers nationally. In 2006 and 2007, in Levels 1, 2 and 3, achievement was significantly above that of Pacific students in other schools. At Levels 1 and 3 in 2008 they maintained this higher level of achievement. At Level 2 that year, they did not achieve as well as those at other schools. This issue was reviewed by the Pacific academic support person and strategies developed to improve achievement.
  • Pacific students are fully engaged in the life of the college. They hold leadership positions, including that of head boy, captains of sports teams and in a range of cultural activities. Students express a strong pride in their contribution to the ‘spirit’ of Wellington College.
  • Pacific culture is respected, affirmed and integrated into the life of the college. New Pacific students are welcomed at the start of the year and leavers farewelled at afio and fiafia evenings. Pacific culture is part of prizegivings and pōwhiri. A major school production, Niu Sila, and the Tama o le Pasifika cultural group during the Tu Tangata festival, had Pacific and palagi boys performing together in Pacific cultural contexts. All students have opportunities to share Pacific culture.
  • The college maintains regular contact with its Pacific community. There is a Pacific representative on the board of trustees. A Pasifika Parents’ Support Group meets regularly to organise events. The termly Achievers’ Evenings, attended by parents, students and many staff, facilitate discussion on aspects of learning and student engagement. The college actively engages with Pacific parents about their sons’ learning.
  • The board plans and resources support to meet the needs of Pacific students. The strategic plan has a goal of ‘adopting a more proactive approach to multicultural issues’. Trustees set annual targets and identify specific strategies related to improving the retention of Pacific students and their achievement in the NCEAs. Senior student achievement data is used as part of self-review processes to monitor progress in meeting the goals and targets. Some subject departments set and review targets for Pacific students. Raising achievement for this group is a clearly defined board priority.

Area for improvement

The overall achievement for Pacific students has yet to match that of their peers at Wellington College. The college’s focus on continuous improvement in the use of assessment data, and in the quality of teaching and learning, is likely to benefit Pacific students and help raise their achievement.

Preparing to Give Effect to The New Zealand Curriculum

Schools are currently working towards implementing The New Zealand Curriculumby February 2010. During this review ERO investigated the progressWellington College is making towards giving full effect to the curriculum as part of its planning, organisation and teaching practice.

ERO found that school leaders and teachers at Wellington College are making good progress towards giving effect to The New Zealand Curriculumin their planning, organisation and teaching.

Including Students with High Needs

During this review ERO investigated the extent to which the board and school leaders of Wellington College provide an inclusive education for students with high needs. This included collecting evidence about the school’s policies, processes and practices to support the enrolment and induction of students with high needs and to support their participation and achievement at school. The information collected during this review will contribute to information that will be reported in a national education evaluation report.

Prior to a review, a board of trustees and principal attest in the Board Assurance Statement that they have taken all reasonable steps to meet their legal requirements including those detailed in Ministry of Education circulars and other documents.

The board of Wellington College was asked to attest to whether it had ‘ensured that teachers of students with disabilities, and other contact staff, have a sound understanding of the learning needs of students with disabilities and, where necessary, have put in place support systems centred on each individual with disabilities.’ The board was also asked to attest that ‘policies and procedures that relate to students who have special education needs are implemented without discrimination’.

ERO’s findings confirm these attestations.

Thinking about the Future

ERO is currently discussing with secondary schools how they are thinking about the future and what it might mean for their students.

The college reports that it has thought about the future and what it might mean for its students in the following ways.

  • The board is aware of the need to prepare for the future learning needs of students as it develops a new strategic plan and associated property plans. Trustees are conscious of the likely impact of demographic change in increasing the ethnic diversity of the college roll.
  • The headmaster has well developed and publically articulated views on the relationship between developing digital teaching and learning opportunities, the introduction of new courses and programmes and the importance of maintaining those elements of the curriculum that have stood the test of time. In managing change and planning for the future, he is acutely aware of the tensions between upholding the traditional ethos of the college and the need to be immersed in twenty first century educational developments. Within these complex relationships he sees it as essential to maintain an emotionally safe environment in which boys can grow into young men aware of their past and confident in their personal futures.

Provision for International Students

Compliance with the Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students and the Provision of English Language Support

Wellington College is a signatory to theCode of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students(the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. This is a requirement of all schools that enrol international students in terms of the Act. Schools are also required to provide English language support for their international students.

Ninety-seven international students were enrolled at the college at the time of this review from eight countries: Iran, India, Cambodia, Korea, Japan, China, Germany and Thailand.

The school complies with all aspects of the Code.

Areas of good performance

  • Staff involved in the care and education of international students regularly review relevant policies and practices. The views of students, home stay parents and teachers contribute to the evaluation of pastoral care and academic progress of students. The 2008 review conducted by the English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) department identified strengths and included clear recommendations to address weaknesses. The annual review required by the Ministry of Education is thoroughly completed and identified changes are effectively implemented. Students benefit from the results of these self review processes.
  • Home stay parents and international staff provide good pastoral care. Students are well supported on arrival. They find staff and other students generally friendly and helpful and become fully integrated into the life of the college. Communication with parents is extensive and ongoing. The three staff directly responsible for international students, and other teachers, regularly discuss and address students’ concerns. The international student centre is well equipped to meet their needs.
  • Students are well provided for in home stay accommodation. Careful student placement ensures student needs, and immediate issues, are handled promptly and effectively. Home stay parents and students receive comprehensive information that provides clear expectations for behaviour, safety and welfare. Regular contact by the home stay manager with caregivers reinforces these expectations. Students appreciate the friendly care and support they receive from their residential caregivers.
  • International students receive well-targeted support to improve their English. All students are comprehensively assessed on entry to school. Lessons in the ESOL class, and NCEA English programmes cater well for these students, who often display a wide range of competency and fluency in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Through mainstream classes, students have opportunities to gain credits towards the NCEAs. International students have a variety of opportunities to gain meaningful academic and vocational qualifications. Students are well prepared for international English language testing system (IELTs) assessments.

5. Board Assurance on Compliance Areas

Overview

Wellington College Before the review, the board of trustees and principal ofcompleted an EROBoard Assurance StatementandSelf-Audit Checklist. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration;
  • curriculum;
  • management of health, safety and welfare;
  • personnel management;
  • financial management; and
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on students’ achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment);
  • physical safety of students;
  • teacher registration;
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions; and
  • attendance.

Compliance

ERO’s investigations did not identify any areas of concern.

6. Recommendation

ERO and the board of trustees have developed the following recommendation that:

The board develop its strategic plan to articulate clear statements of intended learning outcomes at all levels of the college in order to facilitate better:

  • tracking of student achievement and progress over time, particularly in years 9 and 10;
  • prioritising within whole-school professional development; and
  • alignment of college self-review processes.

7. Future Action

ERO is very confident that the board of trustees can govern the school in the interest of the students and the Crown and bring about the improvements outlined in this report. ERO is likely to carry out the next review in four to five years.

Dr Graham Stoop

Chief Review Officer