Onslow College - 20/11/2017

Summary

Onslow College is a co-educational secondary school with a roll of 1240, including 8% Māori students and a small number of Pacific learners. Students enter at Year 9 from a wide range of contributing primary schools and a local intermediate. The college has an enrolment scheme in place.

The shared vision for students at the college is to promote excellence, embrace difference and empower all learners to be confident, connected and to succeed with integrity and dignity.

Areas of strength noted in the August 2014 ERO report have been sustained. Leaders have sought to strengthen teacher and student outcomes in relation to the areas identified for development. Their approach included implementation of a schoolwide focus on literacy, further embedding of a teaching inquiry process, and increased opportunities to share practice between staff to build capability.

The school is a member of the Northern Suburbs Community of Learning | Kāhui Ako.

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Most students achieve well. Leaders, trustees and teachers have high expectations for student success. Reported assessment data shows most enter school at or above expected achievement levels. The majority of students make expected progress in Years 9 and 10, with some learners’ achievement accelerated, particularly in Year 9.

National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA)results are above national figures and reflect similar types of schools at Levels 1, 2 and 3. Some disparity exists for Māori and Pacific students at each level. However, the school has made progress towards achieving equity for all learners, with significant improvements to the percentages of Māori students leaving school with NCEA at Levels 2 and 3, since 2014.

The college recognises the need to ensure that programmes support Pacific learners to remain in school and achieve through to Level 3.

The performance of the college has been sustained over time through the use of well-established systems, processes and practices that respond in supporting the individual needs of learners. Continuing to develop the collective understanding and capacity of staff to undertake learner-focused inquiry and evaluation should support the college to progress its identified priorities.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

Onslow College is well placed to sustain its effective practice and make further improvements the response to Māori and other students whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

The majority of students make expected progress in Year 9 and 10 with some learners’ achievement accelerated. This is more significant in Year 9.

The number of Māori students leaving school with National Certificates of Educational Achievement (NCEAs) at Levels 2 and 3 has increased significantly since 2014, reducing disparity between them and their non-Māori peers within the school. Many effective processes are in place to enable the college to build on the positive trajectory for Māori learners and further promote equity and excellence for all students.

Pacific student achievement is suitably tracked and monitored to ensure an appropriate response to those requiring individual, additional support. The college recognises the need to ensure that programmes support Pacific learners to remain in school and achieve through to Level 3. Students combine with Pacific students from another local college to attend and participate in cultural events, achieving relevant credits in performing arts.

NCEA results are above national figures and reflect similar type schools at Levels 1, 2 and 3. Nearly all students achieve Level 1 literacy and numeracy. Many students receive endorsed qualifications. Student retention at school to 17 years of age is higher than national figures and reflective of similar type schools. In 2016, student leaver data shows the majority of students achieved a minimum of NCEA Level 2, with two thirds achieving Level 3. The school achieved 18 New Zealand Scholarships in 2016.

Leaders and teachers know students well. They gather relevant information in relation to achievement, learning and wellbeing. L to match their teaching to learning needs of individuals in the classroom. The recent introduction of ‘Ako student mentoring’, seeks to ensure a collaborative approach between a key teacher and individual students in monitoring and guiding their achievement. A coherent and united response by learning areas, departments and support services scaffolds successful outcomes for most students.ongitudinal tracking of achievement is appropriately used to develop student profiles. This information is increasingly used by teachers

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Many school processes are effective in enabling achievement and promoting equity and excellence for students.

A strong inclusive culture is underpinned by positive relationships. Transition processes are comprehensive. Classroom conditions promote positive student engagement. Systems support appropriate responses to students’ emotional wellbeing and inclusion at school.

The college continues to strengthen the collective response of Māori culture, language and identity. Students learn in a positive and supportive environment. Curriculum options are appropriate with the provision of tikanga and te reo Māori from Year 9 and into the senior school. The manaakitanga programme supports the inclusion of students arriving through the year. A staff committee, formed from teachers and leaders across the college, is guiding development of culturally responsive practice.

The school uses a range of effective practices, processes and programmes to support students identified with additional or complex learning needs. Curriculum adaptation is designed to achieve educational success and develop relevant skills. External agency support is accessed when required. Families’ involvement in a parent support group promotes learning partnerships with school personnel. Narrative reporting provides comprehensive information to students, parents and families, visually documenting the progress and achievement of individual goals.

Stewardship and management practices are effective. Collaborative leadership sustains strengths in teaching practice and guides development toward ongoing improvement. Governance ensures the school’s strategic and legislative requirements are met and this includes the allocation of appropriate resourcing.

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Schoolwide initiatives have resulted in improvements towards achieving equity for Māori learners. The next step is to develop a more coordinated schoolwide approach to further strengthen Māori success and maintain the positive trajectory in achievement.

Implementation of the appraisal process requires strengthening to further support the monitoring and development of teacher practice.

Further development of collective understanding and capacity of staff to undertake learner-focused inquiry and evaluation is recognised as a priority.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

Provision for international students

. At the time of this ERO review, there were 62 international students attending the school originating from a range of countries in South East Asia, Europe and South America.The school is a signatory to theCode of Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students(the Code) established under section 238F of the Education Act 1989. The school has attested that it complies with all aspects of the Code

Processes for orientation into the school are well planned. International students receive good quality pastoral care. The promotion of their wellbeing is a strong focus. Specific programmes are in place that cater for their academic and language needs. Close tracking of students’ achievement enables leaders to monitor progress towards them realising their goals.

The school makes positive changes in response to its self-review findings that further strengthen provision for international students.

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

Learners are achieving well. The school demonstrates strong progress toward achieving equity in educational outcomes.

Agreed next steps are to:

  • develop a more coordinated schoolwide approach to further strengthen Māori success and maintain the positive trajectory in achievement

  • strengthen implementation of the appraisal process to further support the monitoring and development of teacher practice

  • further develop the collective understanding and capacity of staff to undertake learner focused inquiry and evaluation.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Patricia Davey

Deputy Chief Review Officer Central (Acting)

Te Tai Pokapū - Central Region

20 November 2017

About the school

Location

Wellington

Ministry of Education profile number

269

School type

Secondary (Years 9 to 13)

School roll

1240

Gender composition

Male 61%, Female 39%

Ethnic composition

Māori 8%
Pākehā 64%
Pacific 3%
Asian 11%
Other ethnic groups 14%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

August 2017

Date of this report

20 November 2017

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review August 2014
Education Review May 2011
Education Review August 2007