Selwyn School - 19/01/2018

Summary

Selwyn School is located in Selwyn Heights, Rotorua and provides education for children in Years 1 to 6. The school’s roll of 452 includes 361 Māori children, many of whom whakapapa to Ngāti Whakaue and other local iwi. A very small number of children of Pacific Island descent attend the school. The rūmaki unit provides 47 children with Level 1 Māori immersion education. A challenge identified by the school is the high roll turnover each year.

Since the ERO report in 2014, the principal and one deputy principal continue in their leadership roles. A second deputy principal was appointed in Term 3, 2017. Many staff and whānau have a long history with the school. The board of trustees is made up of new and experienced members, and some bring educational experience to their roles.

Teachers have been involved in many professional development and learning initiatives in literacy and mathematics, the use of digital communication technology, implementing The New Zealand Curriculum, and learning in the rūmaki. A process of teaching as inquiry that supports teachers to reflect on the effectiveness of their teaching practice has been implemented. New initiatives include the introduction of modern learning environments in Years 4 to 6 and a play-based learning environment for new entrants.

In the English medium, the overall pattern of achievement from 2014 to 2016 has remained constant. Approximately half of the roll are achieving at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. The school has sought support from the Ministry of Education (MoE), resulting in the development of a plan in 2017. This plan focuses on raising achievement and the provision of professional development to strengthen teacher capability and improve outcomes for children.

The school is continuing to respond to areas identified for improvement in the 2014 ERO report.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each learner

  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of learners’ progress and achievement

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • monitortargeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO

How well is the school achieving equitable outcomes for all children?

Some school processes are enabling the achievement of equity and excellence. A particular feature of the school is the ongoing wrap-around support for children and their families to reduce barriers to participation. There are consistent expectations and strategies that encourage positive behaviour. Children have opportunities to make choices and learn in meaningful contexts.

Compliance issues were identified. These relate to the consultation and delivery of the health curriculum and aligning the appraisal system with Education Council guidelines and requirements.

Equity and excellence

How effectively does this school respond to Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration?

The school is yet to respond effectively to all Māori and other children whose learning and achievement need acceleration.

In the English medium, the overall pattern of achievement from 2014 to 2016 has remained constant. Approximately half of all children are achieving at or above the National Standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Data shows gender disparity, with the proportion of boys achieving the National Standards declining over the previous three years. Māori children proportionally, are achieving at lower levels than their non-Māori peers at the school.

School leaders have begun to analyse student achievement information to show the rates of progress for cohorts and individual students over time.

In the rūmaki immersion unit, Te Matapuna, in 2016, children are achieving at high levels in pāngarau, panui and tuhituhi in relation to Nga Whanaketanga. Children at risk of underachieving korero-a-waha are being closely monitored and data clearly indicates children make good progress over time. There is no disparity of achievement between boys and girls.

Teachers in the rūmaki classes are using a suitable range of assessment tools to support teaching and learning, and to monitor student progress and achievement.

School conditions supporting equity and excellence

What school processes are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence?

Processes related to the school’s curriculum, teaching practice and provision for children with additional needs are enabling the achievement of equity and excellence.

The school has effective and comprehensive systems to respond to children with additional learning and behaviour needs. The Special Education Needs Coordinator (SENCO) works closely with specialist agencies, teachers and teacher aides to provide appropriate levels of support for children and families. There is a wide range of interventions provided to support children's literacy and mathematics learning. Children who have English as a second language benefit from support provided by trained teacher aides. Children with additional needs experience an inclusive and responsive learning environment.

Some teachers are using teaching practices to improve children’s learning. These include:

  • use of student achievement data to inform planning and teaching

  • teacher inquiries focused on identified students whose learning is at risk

  • culturally responsive interactions that promote success for Māori.

The completion of a contextual Māori medium curriculum is a significant developments for Te Matapuna. This was developed using Te Mātauranga o Aotearoa as a guiding framework and in consultation with a proactive and supportive whānau and iwi. The curriculum is meaningful, contextual and strongly reflects the local stories, tikanga and history of Te Arawa. Clearly defined graduate profiles for both the English and Māori medium classes are aspirational documents that highlight the skills, knowledge and attributes of a successful learners at Selwyn School. This curriculum approach effectively supports children’s learning

Sustainable development for equity and excellence

What further developments are needed in school processes to achieve equity and excellence?

Priority must be placed on raising achievement, particularly Māori children and boys in reading, writing and mathematics.

School leaders identify that continuing to build teacher capability across the school is a priority area for development. Leaders need to ensure that:

  • there are clear, shared and well-understood expectations for teaching practice focused on accelerating the achievement of all children at risk of not succeeding

  • there is a strategic and targeted approach to teacher professional development and embedding effective strategies and practices consistently across all classrooms.

The management and use of student achievement information needs to be strengthened. Charter targets should be specific and include all children whose learning requires acceleration.

Internal evaluation that is focused on improving outcomes for children is at an early stage of development. Currently the school is in the early stages of developing internal evaluation processes focused on outcomes for targeted, at-risk students.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration

  • curriculum

  • management of health, safety and welfare

  • personnel management

  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)

  • physical safety of students

  • teacher registration and certification

  • processes for appointing staff

  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students

  • attendance

  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act

Actions required

ERO identified non-compliance in relation to consultation about and delivery of the health curriculum, and teacher appraisals.

In order to address this the board must:

  1. Comply with the requirement to adopt a statement on the delivery of the health curriculum, at least once in every two years, after consultation with the school’s community.
    [Section 60B Education Act 1989]

To improve current practice, the board of trustees should:

  • Review the appraisal process to align with Education Council New Zealand expectations and requirements, and ensure appraisals are completed annually.
    [Part 31 Education Act 1989]

Going forward

How well placed is the school to accelerate the achievement of all children who need it?

The school has capacity and capability to accelerate learning for all learners. However, disparity in achievement for Māori and/or other learners remains.

Leaders and teachers:

  • know the learners whose progress and achievement need to be accelerated

  • need to develop and implement approaches that effectively meet the needs of each learner

  • need to improve the school conditions that support the acceleration of learners’ progress and achievement

  • need to build teacher capability to accelerate learners’ progress and achievement.

The school agrees to:

  • monitor targeted planning, improved teaching, and learners’ progress
  • discuss the school’s progress with ERO.

ERO will:

  • provide feedback and resources to support the development of more targeted planning
  • provide an internal workshop to support the school to develop effective planning and monitoring processes to support equity and excellence for all learners.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Lynda Pura-Watson

Deputy Chief Review Officer

19 January 2018

About the school

Location

Rotorua

Ministry of Education profile number

1939

School type

Contributing (Years 1 to 6)

School roll

452

Gender composition

Boys                      53%
Girls                       47%

Ethnic composition

Māori                    80%
Pākeha                  18%
Other                      2%

Provision of Māori medium education

Yes

Number of Māori medium classes

1

Total number of students in Māori medium (MME)

47

Total number of students in Māori language in English medium (MLE)

Nil

Number of students in Level 1 MME

47

Review team on site

August 2017

Date of this report

19 January 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)                                          

 

Education Review May 2014
Education Review July 2009
Education Review August 2006