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  1. Robust attestation, registration and police vetting

    BackgroundBoth the Ministerial Inquiry and the Parker Report commented on the lack of robustness in processes associated with making decisions about a teacher being of ‘good character and fit to be a teacher’. One way for schools to be confident about whether a person is of good character is through police vetting. Registered teachers are police vetted when they apply for registration or are renewing their practising certificate. Applicants for limited authority to teach are police vetted at...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/student-safety-in-schools-recruiting-and-managing-staff/robust-attestation-registration-and-police-vetting/

  2. Overview

    Teaching approaches and strategies that workThis evaluation looks at teaching approaches and strategies used in schools where there has been a significant increase in the number of students at or above National Standards in the upper primary school years (Years 5 to 8). We wanted to learn more about any short-term interventions or long-term strategies that may have been influential in bringing about these positive achievement trajectories. We have shared and discussed our findings from some of t...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/teaching-approaches-and-strategies-that-work/overview/

  3. Appendix 1: Wellbeing of students in Years 1 to 8

    Although there is not a single measure for student wellbeing, the factors that contribute to it are interrelated and interdependent. For example, a student’s sense of achievement and success is increased by a sense of feeling safe and secure at school and affects their resilience.The findings explored in this section are from international and national research related to the ideas of a sense of belonging and connection to school, achievement, being active, feeling safe and secure, and feeling...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/wellbeing-for-childrens-success-at-primary-school/appendix-1-wellbeing-of-students-in-years-1-to-8/

  4. References

    Bolstad, R., & Gilbert, J. (2012). Supporting future-oriented learning and teaching - a New Zealand perspective. Wellington: Ministry of Education.Chapman, C. (2014). From within - to between - and beyond - school improvement: A case of rethinking roles and relationships. International Conference for School Effectiveness and Improvement. Yogyakarta. Retrieved September 2016, from www.icsei.net/index.php?id=1667CISCO. (2008). Equipping Every Learner for the 21st Century. CISCO White Paper. Re...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/leading-innovative-learning-in-new-zealand-schools-april-2018/references/

  5. Overview and next steps

    Going to school is an exciting and challenging time for young children and their families. Moving from early childhood education to school can be a positive and rewarding experience that sets children on a successful pathway. It can also be a period of vulnerability for many children. 1 Effective transitions are critical to the development of children’s self-worth, confidence and resilience, and ongoing success at school. This is a time to build relationships, maintain excitement for learning...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/continuity-of-learning-transitions-from-early-childhood-services-to-schools/overview-and-next-steps/

  6. Introduction

    What are Vocational Pathways?Vocational Pathways provide structured ways for students to achieve National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA). The pathways identify a range of Achievement Standards and Unit Standards that prepare students for ongoing education and/or employment in the industry of their choice. It is intended that students will ask teachers or careers advisers for support in using Vocational Pathways to plan a course.As of 2016, there are six colour coded Vocational Pat...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/vocational-pathways-authentic-and-relevant-learning/introduction/

  7. Appendix 2: Secondary schools and Alternative Education indicator framework

    The indicators below outline of the characteristics of good practice for schools’ use of Alternative Education. These indicators are not an exhaustive list but are designed to provide an outline of the quality expected from schools in their use of Alternative Education. Alternative Education within the school’s strategy for engaging students Alternative Education’s place The school’s use of Alternative Education is part of an overall approach which is predominantly effective at...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/secondary-schools-and-alternative-education-april-2011/appendix-2-secondary-schools-and-alternative-education-indicator-framework/

  8. Conclusion

    This report indicates that half the schools investigated were making a difference for students underachieving. In particular, underachieving Māori and Pacific students, and English language learners were targeted for support and experienced success.Teachers and leaders in these schools were energised by the experience of success. Teachers clearly knew how to make a difference and expected to do so. They knew how to connect with students. If something did not work they then trialled something el...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/raising-achievement-in-primary-schools/conclusion/

  9. Introduction

    The achievement of Pacific learners is an ongoing focus for the Ministry, ERO and MPIA. Ministry data from 2011 shows that approximately 66 percent of Pacific school leavers achieve NCEA Level 2, whereas the achievement rate for Pākehā students remains significantly higher at approximately 80 percent.The Ministry has developed two Pasifika Education Plans (PEP) (2009-2012 and 2013-2017) each with specific targets for improving Pacific learner achievement. The Ministry reported progress against...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/making-connections-for-pacific-learners-success/introduction/

  10. 2017 - Briefing to the incoming Minister

    Ko te Tamaiti te Pūtake o te KaupapaThe Child – the Heart of the MatterPart One - About the Education Review Office The Education Review Office (ERO) is responsible for: evaluating the implementation of government education priorities, programmes and policies across the system evaluating the quality of education and care in schools and early learning services and across Kāhui Ako | Communities of Learning supporting improvement in the performance and operation of our early learning services...

    https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/briefing-to-the-incoming-minister-2/part-one-about-the-education-review-office/