Pyes Pa Road School

We maintain a regular review programme to evaluate and report on the education and care of young people in schools.

We are in the process of shifting from event-based external reviews to supporting each school in a process of continuous improvement.

There may be delays between reviews for some schools and kura due to Covid-19 and while we transition to our new way of reviewing.

Read more about our new processes and why we changed the way we review schools and kura.

Find out which schools have upcoming reviews.

School Context

Pyes Pa Road School is a rural full primary, located 17 kilometres south of Tauranga, catering for children from Years 1 to 8. The school has a growing roll of 210 students of whom 34 identify as Māori.

The school’s vision statement is ‘to develop students to be confident, connected, actively involved life-long learners’. School goals relate to literacy, numeracy, improving teacher capability, Māori and Pacific achievement, e-learning, culturally responsive and relational pedagogy, and physical education. Annual targets are focused on accelerating the progress and achievement of students below expected levels in reading, writing and mathematics.

Since the 2014 ERO report there have been significant staff changes and new trustees elected. A new principal was appointed in May 2017 and an assistant principal in January 2018.

Leaders and teachers regularly report to the board, school-wide information about outcomes for students in the following areas:

  • reading, writing, and mathematics.

Pyes Pa School is part of the Tauranga Peninsular Community of Learning|Kāhui Ako.

Evaluation Findings

1 Equity and excellence – achievement of valued outcomes for students

1.1 How well is the school achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for all its students?

The school is achieving equitable and excellent outcomes for most of its students. School achievement information at the end of 2017 showed that most students achieved at or above national expectations in reading, mathematics and writing. Overall levels of achievement in reading and writing between 2015 and 2017 decreased slightly. There is a small disparity of achievement between Māori and other students in reading and writing. Māori boys achieve at lower levels in writing than other students.

1.2 How well is the school accelerating learning for those Māori and other students who need this?

Teachers are able to show accelerated progress for individual students. Leaders now need to use this information to report accelerated progress for identified groups of at-risk students.

2 School conditions for equity and excellence – processes and practices

2.1 What school processes and practices are effective in enabling achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Leaders promote conditions that support the achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning. The recently established leadership team works collaboratively and is building relational trust. They have reviewed the school charter and curriculum and are providing increased professional learning and development through the Tauranga Peninsular Community of Leaning and networking opportunities. There are clear expectations for assessment, teaching and learning programmes in literacy and mathematics. These conditions are contributing to shared and high expectations for teaching and learning.

The curriculum is responsive and meaningful. Connections to students’ lives, prior learning and interesting real-world contexts are engaging for students. There is an appropriate focus on reading, writing and mathematics. Classroom teachers know their target students well and use assessment information to plan appropriate programmes and monitor their progress. The learning environment is managed in ways that support participation, and engagement in learning. Community and cultural resources are integrated in to relevant aspects of the school curriculum. Relationships are respectful and productive. Students benefit from caring, collaborative learning environments.

The school’s inclusive culture effectively promotes equitable opportunities for students. Teachers have a holistic view of students where difference and diversity are valued. There are positive and effective student centred relationships with whānau and external agencies. The Special Education Needs Coordinator (SENCO) has well established professional relationships with external agencies, parents and whānau. Students with additional leaning needs participate in learning opportunities that provide appropriate support and challenge.

Leaders and teachers have effectively established productive learning partnerships with parents and whānau. Parents, whānau and the community are welcomed and involved in school activities as respected and valued partners in learning. A positive approach to transition into the school ensures students and parents are made to feel welcome, affirmed and actively engaged in the life of the school.

The board actively represents and serves the school and community in its stewardship role. It is focused on student learning and wellbeing. Trustees have a shared understanding of their roles and responsibilities and use their collective knowledge, expertise and experience to make informed governance decisions. The board has a strong focus on providing a safe physical and emotional environment. The highly committed and well informed board of trustees is focused on improving student outcomes and school development.

2.2 What further developments are needed in school processes and practices for achievement of equity and excellence, and acceleration of learning?

Strengthening student agency is an agreed area for development. Teaching practice should include the use of learning progressions to allow students, to track their achievement, identify their specific next learning goal and lead their own learning.   

The management and use of school-wide achievement data needs refining. Leaders now need to report to the board of trustees school-wide information about the rates of expected and accelerated progress for identified groups of at-risk students.

School targets need to be more specifically focus on students needing to make accelerated progress in reading, writing and mathematics. This is necessary to:

  • monitor and track the progress and achievement of these learners
  • align annual school-wide targets to teacher planning and practice
  • strengthen the internal evaluation of the effectiveness of the school’s response to at-risk students.

3 Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board and principal of the school completed the ERO board assurance statement and self-audit checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to the following:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • finance
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student safety and wellbeing:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration and certification
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand down, suspension, expulsion and exclusion of students
  • attendance
  • school policies in relation to meeting the requirements of the Vulnerable Children Act 2014.

4 Going forward

Key strengths of the school

For sustained improvement and future learner success, the school can draw on existing strengths in:

  • professional leadership that is committed to the ongoing improvement of student outcomes
  • a school curriculum that strongly reflects the school’s vision, aims and aspirations for achievement and success
  • an inclusive school culture and community that engages in reciprocal, learning-centred relationships
  • governance that is highly committed to the success of the school and its students.

Next steps

For sustained improvement and future learner success, priorities for further development are in:

  • building students’ assessment and learning to learn capabilities
  • school-wide targeted planning for acceleration.

ERO’s next external evaluation process and timing

ERO is likely to carry out the next external evaluation in three years. 

Lynda Pura-Watson
Deputy Chief Review Officer

Te Tai Miringa - Waikato / Bay of Plenty Region

19 April 2018

About the school 

Location

Pyes Pa, Tauranga

Ministry of Education profile number

1916

School type

Full primary Years (1-8)

School roll

210

Gender composition

Boys      55%
Girls       45%

Ethnic composition

Pakeha                                  71%
Māori                                    16%
Samoan                                  4%
Other European                       5%
Other                                      4%

Provision of Māori medium education

No

Review team on site

February 2018

Date of this report

19 April 2018

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review 2014
Education review September 2011
Education review December 2009

Findings

Pyes Pa Road School is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Trustees, leaders and staff are highly committed to raising student achievement. Students have many opportunities to learn and excel academically and culturally. Parent and whānau participation in school activities contributes to an holistic approach to the education of young people.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

1 Context

What are the important features of this school that have an impact on student learning?

Pyes Pa Road School is a rural full primary for Years 1 to 8 students, located 17 kilometres from central Tauranga. At the time of this review 167 students were enrolled including 35 who are affiliated to iwi throughout Aotearoa.

A team of both experienced and new trustees are providing effective school governance. Staff, students, parents and whānau have a strong sense of community and belonging. Traditions, the rural setting and an inclusive school culture are highly valued. Relationships are founded on mutual respect and trust. Parents and whānau are involved and contribute to a range of school activities, which enrich opportunities for student learning and enhance the home-school partnership.

Since ERO’s 2011 review trustees have continued to upgrade indoor and outdoor facilities. There are vibrant teaching and learning spaces including specialist classrooms for art, music, extension te reo Māori and learning support programmes. In addition, the school has made significant progress in the areas identified for development in the 2011 report. These include assessment practice, the integration of te reo Maori throughout the school, and the implementation of school curriculum review.

In 2013 an experienced principal joined the school. She has established a positive working relationship with the well-established teaching team. They are focused on professional learning and development that aims to improve teaching practice and outcomes for students.

2 Learning

How well does this school use achievement information to make positive changes to learners’ engagement, progress and achievement?

Student achievement information is effectively used by school leaders, teachers and trustees to make positive changes to student’s engagement, progress and achievement. The school has given priority to strengthening teacher’s analysis and interpretation of student assessment data. Teachers use student achievement to reflect on and inform their practice, plan programmes in response to student learning needs, and raise student achievement.

The school has reviewed and changed the written report format and the way information is shared with parents. Students, their parents and teacher now discuss and work together to promote student learning and determine future learning goals. Consideration should now be given to gaining parents' views in relation to the clarity and usefulness of written reports, particularly about how their child is progressing and achieving in relation to National Standards.

The principal and senior leaders manage student achievement information to inform targeted intervention and extension programmes, initiatives and self review. Trustees receive well-analysed and interpreted student achievement reports from the principal. This allows them to make appropriate decisions about how they can effectively support school targets to raise student achievement and improve student learning.

The school has well-developed practices for identifying individual students needs, abilities and talents. There is a shared belief that all students have a right to quality education and can make a contribution and learn. A comprehensive range of well-coordinated and regularly reviewed special programmes and initiatives support student learning. Monitoring and tracking of student achievement indicates accelerated progress for groups and individual students participating in these programmes.

The school’s end of year student achievement information for 2013 shows that in reading and mathematics the vast majority of students are achieving at and above the National Standard (NS). In writing most boys are achieving at and above the NS, however, their achievement level is lower than that of girls. Māori students are achieving at comparable levels to non-Māori students. Overall student achievement data shows that the school is already at the Ministry of Education goal of 85% of all students being at or above NS by 2017. The schools information also shows high levels of achievement in other curriculum areas including science, technology, te reo Māori, art and physical education.

3 Curriculum

How effectively does this school’s curriculum promote and support student learning?

Pyes Pa Road School curriculum is effective in promoting and supporting student learning. It is well designed and strongly reflects the principles, values and key competencies of The New Zealand Curriculum, and community priorities and aspirations for Pyes Pa Road learners. The following features contribute to the school’s holistic and comprehensive curriculum.

An appropriate emphasis on literacy and mathematics, which is well integrated into meaningful learning contexts.

The significant increase in the presence of Māori language, culture and identity in classroom programmes and practices.

Opportunities for students to learn and excel academically and culturally, which include performing and visual art, sporting activities and education outside the classroom (EOTC).

Vibrant learning environments that include purposeful use of information and communication technologies for enhancing teaching and learning.

ERO observed high levels of student engagement and enjoyment in learning and mutually respectful relationships throughout t he school. These relationships and levels of engagement are complemented by teachers’ in-depth knowledge of students.

The principal and teachers work collaboratively to ensure continuity of learning for students and consistency of expectations and teaching practice. They actively share ideas and strategies for raising the achievement of all students. These strategies help students to understand their progress, achievement and next steps in learning. Ongoing collaboration between teachers, students and parents should encourage the further development of specific learning inquiry goals, and contribute to student learning outcomes.

How effectively does the school promote educational success for Māori, as Māori?

The Pyes Pa Road School charter effectively promotes educational success for Māori, as Māori, and their language, culture and identity is affirmed at all levels of the school.

The school has developed a culture that embraces the needs and aspirations of Māori students and their whānau. Management and teachers demonstrate this commitment through the natural integration of tikanga Māori in formal and informal routines and celebrations. There are weekly te reo Māori classes and a te reo Parekareka extension class. The teacher responsible for this initiative is supportive of all teachers as they integrate te reo and tikanga Māori into their classroom practice.

The school is developing strong connections with whānau and local places of significance for Māori. The board of trustees are actively involved in supporting the school's commitment to Māori students and whānau, and resource the school appropriately.

4 Sustainable Performance

How well placed is the school to sustain and improve its performance?

Pyes Pa Road School is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Trustees are well informed and highly committed to raising student achievement.

The principal’s collaborative leadership style is pivotal in promoting an inclusive culture for learning and she is well supported by the associate principals. They effectively work with teachers to ensure that agreed expectations for teaching and learning are met.

Robust self review at governance, school leadership and classroom level informs school direction. There is a comprehensive teacher performance appraisal system focused on improving teacher practice and building a collaborative learning culture.

Sustaining partnerships with parents, whānau and the community continue to be a school priority. Parent and whānau participation in school events and activities contributes to a holistic approach to the education of young people.

Board assurance on legal requirements

Before the review, the board of trustees and principal of the school completed the ERO Board Assurance Statement and Self-Audit Checklists. In these documents they attested that they had taken all reasonable steps to meet their legislative obligations related to:

  • board administration
  • curriculum
  • management of health, safety and welfare
  • personnel management
  • financial management
  • asset management.

During the review, ERO checked the following items because they have a potentially high impact on student achievement:

  • emotional safety of students (including prevention of bullying and sexual harassment)
  • physical safety of students
  • teacher registration
  • processes for appointing staff
  • stand-downs, suspensions, expulsions and exclusions
  • attendance.

Conclusion

Pyes Pa Road School is well placed to sustain and improve its performance. Trustees, leaders and staff are highly committed to raising student achievement. Students have many opportunities to learn and excel academically and culturally. Parent and whānau participation in school activities contributes to an holistic approach to the education of young people.

ERO is likely to carry out the next review in three years.

Dale Bailey

National Manager Review Services Northern Region

21 October 2014

About the School

Location

Pyes Pa

Ministry of Education profile number

1916

School type

Full Primary (Years 1 to 8)

School roll

167

Gender composition

Boys 56%

Girls 44%

Ethnic composition

NZ European/Pākehā

Māori

Other European

Other

69%

21%

9%

1%

Review team on site

August 2014

Date of this report

21 October 2014

Most recent ERO report(s)

Education Review

Education Review

Education Review

September 2011

December 2009

December 2006